Ka’imi’s program at Eo Emalani 2016

Ka’imi’s program at Eo Emalani 2016

Our Kumu as Master of Ceremonies Sailing in on the canoe! The day could hardly have been more favorable: blue sky, warm sun moderated by the occasional breeze, Kanaloahuluhulu meadow dressed in glorious green… You can get the visual imagery from Mike Teruya’s photographs, and your imagination/memory will supply sounds, scents, and general atmosphere. For those who were not there, or who did not get copies of the printed program, here is the text explaining Ka `Imi’s performance: We are all navigators. Everyone here today used navigation to reach Koke`e, even if only to go out the door and into a vehicle that someone else drove. Navigation or wayfinding is something we all do, often without thinking much about it. Polynesians, however, refined the process into science and art. Using natural signs such as winds, clouds, birds, waves, and stars, they explored and colonized many islands throughout the vast Pacific, including Hawaii, Tahiti, New Zealand. Surpassing the Chinese, Phonecians, Arabs, and Vikings, they became the finest seafarers of the pre-modern world. Our program today salutes them and their present-day descendants. We enter singing about sailing in search of a dream. The song comes from Taumako, a small Polynesian community in the eastern Solomon Islands, whose people still build and sail the kind of canoes their ancestors used to travel the ancient searoads. We then perform a hula kala`au (stick dance) from Kauai which describes astronomical and other navigational signs. A song honoring Queen Emma as a warrior who braved the deep ocean to travel within her kingdom and to North America and Europe follows. Our last dance brings us...
‘Hawaiians as Scientists’ DVD Fall Educators’ Special

‘Hawaiians as Scientists’ DVD Fall Educators’ Special

A working kalo (taro) and more eco-farm is dependent on a steady, fresh water supply channeled and routed from source streams in the traditional cultural way.   Photo by Dawn F. Kawahara Kapa`a, Hawai`i–School is in full swing now, the autumn equinox arrived Sept. 22, and the rainy season will soon be upon us, relieving areas of drought and dryness and renewing the life of the land. Members of the educational committee of Ka `Imi Na`auao o Hawai`i Nei Institute are reaching out to school principals, teachers, cultural and club leaders, and librarians to announce a fall semester “Educators’ Special” for the non-profit cultural Institute’s DVD and study guide, “Hawaiians as Scientists, He Mele No Kane (The Waters of Kane).” This innovative teaching tool on the importance of the water cycle in nature was carefully planned as a ready-to-use lesson plan. The “hands-on” units require observation and critical thinking. The Ka `Imi-produced teaching-and-learning product describes the water cycle as illustrated by the traditional Hawaiian chant illustrating “The Waters of Kane.” It includes a comprehensive lecture on the importance of fresh water streams and animals throughout the natural cycle by Kaua`i District Aquatic Biologist Donald Heacock. Ka `Imi students of the Maui branch school were filmed for the chant segment in natural settings, mauka to makai (mountains to sea). The lecture was filmed at a working kalo (taro) farm. The material is geared to elementary through middle school classes and beyond, to life learners. Regularly $25, the cost to educators (which includes cultural and organizational leaders and librarians) will be $15 per copy. The idea of offering the DVD Educators’ Special...
Mana, Kapu, and Noa at Keahualaka

Mana, Kapu, and Noa at Keahualaka

Abstract of paper for Association for Social Anthropology in Oceania (ASAO) Annual Meeting, San Diego, CA 9-14 February, 2016. To be presented at the New Proposed Session: The Experiential Roots of Mana MANA, KAPU, AND NOA AT KEAHUALAKA, A SACRED HAWAIIAN SITE AT KE`E, KAUA`I Heu`ionalani Wyeth Ka`Imi Na`auao o Hawai`i Nei Institute Beautiful for situation, Keahualaka (the altar of Laka) or Kauluolaka (the inspiration and growth of Laka) hovers like a mighty bird over Ke`e beach on Kaua`i’s north shore. Lying as it does at the end of the coastal road and near the beginning of famous hiking trail, the site attracts many visitors. Some come specifically to experience the place’s mana, others inadvertently wander in. Whoever they may be and whatever their reasons may be for walking the path up to the site, these people are merely the latest in a line of visitors that goes back centuries. Po`e hula (hula people), students of Polynesian culture, and adherents of traditional Hawaiian religion revere Keahualaka for its connections with Laka, Pele, Hi`iaka, and Lohiau. Photographers, artists, and tourists are inpressed its physical beauty. New Age religionists seek it out as a place of power. Each visitor reacts to the site’s mana differently. The common denominator is that Keahualaka affects everyone, and everyone affects Keahualaka. This has created problems for those who look after the place. Under an agreement with its former owners, our Institute served as volunteer caretakers from 1975 to 1992. During that time, we removed rubbish, eradicated invasive plants, produced informational materials for visitors, and organized cultural performances on site. Our protocol followed the instruction of...
‘Hawaiian style’ lesson plans DVD soon to be released; Ka `Imi Institute continues global cultural exchange

‘Hawaiian style’ lesson plans DVD soon to be released; Ka `Imi Institute continues global cultural exchange

  Members of Ka `Imi Na`auao o Hawai`i Nei Institute are pleased to announce the upcoming release of a teaching video and series of lesson plans, “He Mele no Kane; Hawaiians as Scientists.” This innovative teaching tool promotes cultural learning through films and photographs of traditional chant and hula combined with related lesson plans geared to the classroom. Appropriate for elementary through middle school grades, the DVD will be made available this fall as part of the continuing educational mission of Ka `Imi Na`auao o Hawai`i Nei Institute. Additional advanced lesson plans for high school and advanced levels will follow. School principals, teachers and cultural leaders, librarians adding to Hawaiian resource materials, as well as anyone interested in furthering their understanding of Hawaiian conceptual knowledge may contact the Institute to reserve advance copies of this educational tool. Ka `Imi is a non-profit 501-C3 educational institute that has been in existence since the 1970s. The purchase price of the DVD and lesson plans will be nominal. The “Hawaiians as Scientists” educational project grew out of the successful Ka `Imi staged hula chronicles of “Recalling Hawai`i,” choreographed and directed by Kumu Hula Bailey. Starring casts numbered up to 50 dancers and musicians of the Institute, hailing from school branches world-wide. The crowd-pleasing multi-media spectacular has proven its success in each of eight presentations to date, from Germany and Switzerland (2010), to Kaua`i (2011), Maui (2012), Hawai`i and O`ahu (2013), as well as Northern California (2014).   Following the Hilo Theater presentation, Brenda Lee, a Hawaiian activist, said, “Every school child in Hawai`i should have the opportunity to see and learn from...
Ka ’Imi in Geneva: Reception at the U.S. Mission Independance Day 2015

Ka ’Imi in Geneva: Reception at the U.S. Mission Independance Day 2015

Dancers of Ka ’Imi Switzerland, Germany and Austria performed at the permanent U.S. Mission to the United Nations in Geneva, Switzerland on July 7th 2015, on occasion of the celebration of Independence Day 2015. The theme of this afternoon was Hawaii and the “Aloha Spirit”. Ambassador Pamela Hamamoto (grown up in Hawaii) invited the Band Na Ohana Ho’aloha from Moloka’i to play for the reception and suggested that a Swiss Hula Halau should participate to make the connection to the guest country and to enhance cultural exchange. Ka ’Imi picked up the invitation and participated with dancers not only Switzerland but also from our German and Austrian Halau. Manja from Switzerland and Anna from Germany visited the band on Moloka’i in February 2015 and got a first taste of dancing with the group during one of their weekly shows at the Paddlers Inn. After a lot of preparation we all met in Geneva on Sunday July 5th starting rehearsing in extreme summer heat. Everybody put their full effort into getting the dances tuned up, making leis for us, for guests of honor as well as for some of the U.S. Mission staff. Monday July 6th we went to the U.S. Mission to rehearse with the band. We only had this one day to get to know each other, finding the same rhythm, pick the right versions of the songs, agree on verses, beginnings and endings. It was an intense and exhausting rehearsal. But it was worth it: The next day nobody could believe that this was the first time we all met and played and danced together. The staff...
Hula Alapa‘i i Noho i Kuali‘i of Oahu celebrates 25th Anniversary

Hula Alapa‘i i Noho i Kuali‘i of Oahu celebrates 25th Anniversary

Our O‘ahu hālau observed its 25th anniversary on July 13, 2014.  Featured were favorite kahiko and ‘auwana hula by keiki and makua classes.  Most of these hulas come from Ka ‘Imiʻs shared repertoire.  Others, such as the keikiʻs “Toad Song” and “Ūlili E”, and the mākuaʻs “Kaleohano” and “Alekoki”, were created by Hi‘ipoi.  One of the joys of this year has been witnessing the pleasure and pride of older beginner adults who have always wanted to dance hula, but never did until this past year! Kamal`i Stately “Kaulilua” danced by mākua and ‘ōpio “Pua ka ‘Ōhelo” “Puamana” danced by mākua and kūpuna “Toad” song “Kaleohano”...
Praise for Recalling Hawaii California

Praise for Recalling Hawaii California

Dear Roselle and Jim, Savitri, and the Board, Cast, and Supporters of Ka’imi Na’Auao ‘o Hawai’i Nei: Mahalo Nui Loa for the gift that you gave the people of California.  Your Marin performance of “Recalling Hawaii” was absolutely magnificent! From start to finish the audience was enthralled with the Aloha that you poured upon us.  The sheer truth, beauty, emotional depth, and artistry of it was so powerful that every person in that theater was deeply touched…so deeply that tears were flowing very frequently throughout the show.  Roselle’s words about tears at the show opening really opened the healing flood gates! Sitting in the audience, surrounded by strangers, I constantly heard people gasping with awe, whispering “Wooowww” and “Oh my God!”  Really, it was just amazing the engagement that you performers accomplished with the audience.  It was life-changing for those lucky people who were there. They were so surprised at how good and full of learning this show was! As usual there were people who had no idea there was an overthrow by the USA.  Many in attendance were amazed that there was so much they could learn about Hawaiian culture. After the show one serious hula student friend of mine from Marin exclaimed to me  “I am so ashamed of my poor ability in Hawaiian language!  I must study much harder!”  I heard several people express joyful amazement at how accomplished the kamali’i were.  One man asked me why there were no men dancing.  He said “I know that men dance hula … why were there none here tonight?”  I wished I had a good answer for him....
California Ho’ike

California Ho’ike

Kahiko Ha Lapa I Hula Alapa’i O Ke Anuenue under the direction of Lynn Roth, gathered for a pot luck and Ho’ike, on May 5th, 2013.   All four classes  experienced dancing together, some for the first time. Besides new dances, we performed several “oldies” that everyone knew.  It was a very successful day, as you can see from the smiling faces. Click here for the...