Hula & Hawaiian Culture in Koke`e

Hula & Hawaiian Culture in Koke`e

“Willkommen, ein neuer Tag beginnt… Wach auf! Die Sonne ist wieder da Fuer dich der Regenbogen” (Welcome the new day that is beginning … wake up! The sun is back again, and is making a rainbow just for you) part of oli ho`ala composed by German students November 2002 For five days in early November, Pu`u Hinahina cabin went international. A group of German lomilomi students (and one lomilomied spouse!) studied hula, native plants, and Hawaiian forest lore with Roselle. Arriving at Koke`e after a workshop with Penny Prior, and having already seen some of Kaua`i’s sights (including Eo e Emmalani i Alaka`i on 12 Ocotber), the group was relaxed and eager to learn more about things Hawaiian. They went to the right place. Days went by all too fast, in the excitement of new words, new concepts, new skills. In the evenings, students listened to talks by experts like David Boynton and Marsha Erickson, or watched videos about native Hawaiian birds, astronomy and cultural practices. During interludes, halau members sang and danced for informal entertainment. On the last evening, however, when electricity failed in Koke`e, and no guest lecturer was on the schedule, it was the Germans’ turn to teach. Despite never having sung together before, they performed their own traditional songs in lovely multi-part harmony until late into the night. Several of them remarked that many modern German performers do not represent their own traditions of song and dance very well. Often they do not take the trouble to learn correct ways of dancing or singing folk music. Certain families have preserved the true musical traditions, but...
Kumu Workshop

Kumu Workshop

Continuing Education for Kumu: Koke’e, Kaua’i Nä Kumu from Kaua’i and Oahu became nä haumana during a retreat at Pu’uhinahina cabin in Koke’e, Kaua’I, November 1 – 3, 2002. The kumu, together with Kumu Roselle Bailey spent the weekend continuing their education in hula protocol. Instruction included pairing off and exploring the Koke’e waonahele to identify and collect plants required for construction of a kuahu hula, continued learning of the oli kuahu, and understanding the order of protocol. Hi’ipoikealoha Ho represented Oahu halau, and Moanikeala Finberg, Keakawaiola Jardin, Keahi Manea, and Heu’ionalani Wyeth represented Kaua’i, and Kananiokeanuenue Roth represented California. These kumu have at cumulative total of more than 100 years of hula experience among them, all under the direction of Kumu Roselle. The adventure in the waonehele was especially pleasant. The day was extraordinarily clear and bright, the forest lush and fragrant from recent rain, and the assigned activity challenging. Some of us knew where the harder-to-find plants were and headed straight there, happening on the others along the way. Others simply picked a nearby area, and kept exploring until all the plants were found. We had varying levels of expertise in plant knowledge and identification skills. What we all discovered was that the plants are in abundance, but because we are not usually seeking them, we walk right by without seeing them. We were given 2 hours for the task, but it was so enjoyable, we wanted to stay longer. Perhaps there was a small amount of fear about the next required task of actually building the kuahu and reciting the oli. Another highlight of the weekend...

HEIVA I Kaua`i 2002, Tahitian Dance Competition

For an intense few days in August of 2002, Kukui Grove Pavillion in Lihu’e resounded with the frenetic pounding of toere, subtle south Pacific harmonies, and roars of audience approval as the first annual Heiva I Kaua’i Ia Orana Tahiti International Tahitian dance competition got under way. As the title suggests, it was truly an international event, with contestants traveling from as far as Tahiti and New Caledonia. Local talent from several islands in Hawai’i also put on a good show. Besides dancers and musicians, the event featured craftspeople from around the Pacific, and, typical of any Polynesian get together, plenty of food. Ka ‘Imi Na’auao o Hawai’i Nei put in a short but significant appearance during the opening ceremonies. Representing the host culture, Keahi Manea, wife of Heiva organizer Tepairu Manea, and Heu’ionalani Wyeth welcomed the visiting performers with oli and hula appropriate to the occasion. The guests, clearly pleased with this presentation, responded by piling gifts in front of the hosts. Many people who witnessed this ceremony had never seen its like before, and also found it impressive. Besides Keahi and Heu’ionalani, other members of our organization helped out in less visible but equally important ways. People donated food, time, supplies, services, and aloha for the visitors. All of them deserve praise and thanks. Heiva I Kaua’i 2003 will take place on 17-20 July. Anyone interested in participating should contact Tepairu at 808 822 9447 or visit...