E O Emalani I Alaka’i Festival

E O Emalani I Alaka’i Festival

As they do each October, members of Ka `Imi Na`auao o Hawai`I Nei assembled in Kanaloahuluhulu Meadow to honor Queen Emma at the annual Eo E Emalani i Alaka`i Festival.  Even those who have participated in this event many times find it exciting.  Each year’s festival has its own distinct character, and the 2006 celebration was no exception. Several members spent a foggy and soggy Friday night cocooned in Pu`uhinahina cabin.  Among them were Roselle and Jim Bailey, newly returned from Roselle’s autumn session with the European students. Others, including Birgitta, Sherrie, Tebo, Louise, Savitri, and Shoshanna, trekked up the mountain early Saturday. Ka `Imi members usually greet the queen’s arrival into Kanaloahuluhulu by singing to her as she descends the path.  This year, wet weather delayed her entrance, so performers had plenty of time to spend practicing mele while they waited.  What could have been a tedious interval turned lively when photographer Tim Dela Vega strode onto the scene.  Tim is not only a first-rate cameraman, but a naural comedian, the sort of person who always brightens up the scene.  (We hope to have some of the pictures he shot on this site soon!) The scene certainly needed some brightening, for soon after the Queen arrived the sun, which had been trying to claw its way through cloud and mist, threw up its hands and surrendered.  By the time Ka `Imi members began their second dance, rain was sheeting down.  As ever, our performers rose to the occasion, thoroughly enjoying getting a heavy heavenly blessing.  Several echoed Keahi`s statement that it was one of their happiest hula moments...
India Meets Hawaii on Kauai’s North Shore

India Meets Hawaii on Kauai’s North Shore

A Successful Educational Fund raising event was held September 30, 2006 for Kaimi and for Kolam Foundation to support our journey to India. Thanks go out to all who attended and all who worked on this wonderful event. We have been asked to make it an annual event! FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  12-11-06 Hawai`i Meets India by Dawn Fraser Kawahara C. 2006 WAILUA, Kaua`i–Members of Ka `Imi Na`au`ao O Hawai`i Nei Institute are preparing to participate in a cultural exchange in Tamil Nadu, South India, in January 2007. The Hawaiian culture educational group, under the direction of Kumu Hula Roselle Keli`ihonipua Bailey, will be coordinating the trip with Kaua`i representative Vi Ganesan of The Kolam Charitable Foundation, a foundation involved in working to benefit the needy and poor women, men and children in Tamil Nadu by helping them achieve economic independence. The group of about 20 Institute members of varied ages will come together from various branches of Ka `Imi, from Kaua`i as well as from O`ahu and Maui, California and Virginia, Samoa and Germany. Fundraising started some months ago. One of the key events toward this purpose on Kaua`i was a day sponsored by both organizations, “Kihapai Kou Mana” (“Tending Your Spiritual Essence”), held on Sept. 30, 2006, in Princeville. Participants came to feed mind, body and spirit in a beautiful setting for the cause. They partook of yoga, water exercise, hula movement, art classes, lei making, and various massage therapies provided by professionals. An Indian cooking demonstration and ongoing Indian luncheon prepared by Ms. Ganesan and her crew of volunteer helpers was served. Intricate needlework renderings of kolam...
Hula seminar on Maui and Kauai

Hula seminar on Maui and Kauai

While we are sitting on the San Francisco airport, we reviewed the wonderful time we had during our Hula seminar on Maui and Kauai. It was a big adventure. For some of us it was the first trip to Hawai’i and therefore very exciting and sometimes overwhelming. Staying together with 16 women in one room with one toilet and bathroom was challenging, but a good experience, too. It was so wonderful to meet the ladies from Hawai’i again who had been in Germany in 2004 as well as Kawai. And we enjoyed to meet several Hula sisters we did not know before. We’d like to thank all the Kauai ladies for hosting us and making one day more delicious than the day before. Staying at Limahuli and Koke’e was like paradise. When we joined our Hula-sisters during the ceremony at Ke ahu a Laka it was an exciting and very special moment for us. We learned a lot when we went together with Puanani and Ed Lindsey to Honokawai, Ukumehame and the taro patch. It was nice to enjoy natur and to help to take care of the nature. Our first time paddeling was another challenge. As soon we were in the canoes, it was fun. And we saw turtels in the sea. We enjoyed to see all the places we know from our songs and dances. Special thanks to Jim who took us around Maui and Kauai and who had a lot of patience with 16 women! A lot of things we have done and seen would not have been possible, if we would have come to Hawai’i...
Ka`Imi Making Plans to Travel to India

Ka`Imi Making Plans to Travel to India

On January 11, 2007, some 20 members will help Roselle fulfill her long-held dream of performing in India. Thanks to the efforts of Kaua`i`s Savitri Kumaran, the group will travel first to Chennai, and then work southward, ending at Madurai about ten days later. Rehearsals for this tour began on 11 June, the day after Kahiko Halapa i Hula Alapa`i o Keahi`s ho’ike. You can see from the photos how hard everyone was working! We shall have more information on the India trip later. Participants will be raising funds for their airfares and other expenses, and would gladly accept donations. If you would like to help a specific halau member with her/his travel costs, please contact her/him directly. If you would like to contribute to the group’s funds, you may contact our...
Kahiko Halapa I Hula Alapa`i O Keahi Ho`ike

Kahiko Halapa I Hula Alapa`i O Keahi Ho`ike

The theme of this year’s ho`ike was kahakai–seashore, and its setting, a stone’s throw from the ocean at Lydgate Park in Wailua, perfectly expressed this choice. To prepare for the event, students learned several new mele, including Keahi Manea’s original composition Mele Kupe`e, gathered lei materials appropriate to this ecologic zone, and studied its complex environment. For many modern First World people, the seashore conjures thoughts of recreation and relaxation. Tourism promoters throughout the tropical world exploit this association, using beach scenes to entice visitors. Glance at any rack of Hawaiian postcards, and you will probably see that images of the seaside predominate. Yet how much do these gleaming superficialities really tell? Try asking a lifeguard, biologist or `opihi picker how benign this environment is and you will get some very different ideas. Another meaning of kaha, “to scratch, mark,…cut…or slice” (from Puku`i and Elbert’s dictionary, p. 109) informs their experience. On mature islands like Kaua`i and the Northwestern archipelago, the ocean constantly claws away land. Travel to Puna on Hawai`i island, however, and you will see new land sinking its talons into the sea, or even, if you wait a few millenia, Lo`ihi seamount scrambling surfaceward. Chronically unstable, alternately soaked and scoarched, thrashed by wind, pitted by salt, kahakai is not an easy place for any plant, animal, or human to make a living. Survival here demands strength, resiliance, and courage. These are also, of course, qualities required of those who would study hula. Our mele and hula celebrated many expressions of these qualities in the kahakai ecosystem. They also honor those, including the young man from Kapa`a...
Kaua`i World Challenge Canoe Race

Kaua`i World Challenge Canoe Race

Once again, members of Kahiko halapa i Hula Alapa`i o Keahi chanted and danced for paddlers in the Kaua`i World Challenge canoe race. Last May, Halau members conducted a traditional welcome to Kalapaki Bay for competitors in the Kaua`i World Challenge canoe race. Organizers were so impressed with what we did, which organizer Tom Bartlett called “the most intense performance I have seen in 40 years of living in Hawai`i”, that they requested a hana hou at this year’s event on Saturday, May 13. Click here to view photos of last year’s event on May 7, 2005. Relaxing after a job well-done are (noho left to right) Penny, Keahi, (ku left to right) Savitri, Heu`i, Birgitta, Sherrie, Louise and Fran. Sherrie and Fran perform He Mele no Kane as paddlers stand waist-deep in Kane’s element awaiting their turns to...
Hula Workshops on Kaua`i

Hula Workshops on Kaua`i

“Lucky you live Kaua`i” recently took on a new meaning for halau members; Roselle needed to be on island for two events, the annual membership meeting of Hui o Laka, and Dawn Kawahara’s book signing, on successive weekends in late November and early December. While she was here, she taught three workshops on Hapa Haole Hula. As she explained, “it is important to know these songs. They are part of our tradition, and are dear to kupuna who grew up with them in the 40’s and 50’s.” Songs she taught were favorites like “Song of Old Hawaii”, and the ever-popular “Hukilau.” In the second and third sessions, students worked on more recent examples of the genre: “Hula Lady” and “Moonlight Lady.” For haumana who already knew some of these songs, the workshop was a good refresher, and for others, a good learning experience. Turnout for all the sessions was good, especially since they took place on weekends during the season to be busy. It was wonderful to see many old-timers back in the line-up, and just as wonderful to have a visit from the newest new-timer of all, Jessi’s baby grand daughter! A GOOD TURNOUT of old and not so old-timers at the 3 December workshops in Koloa. THIS IS HOW IT SHOULD LOOK: Roselle demonstrates a gesture from “Moonlight...

Kaua’i Museum

Kaua`i Museum is one of the best places on the island to learn about local culture. For many visitors. it is the first, and sometimes only, place they encounter Hawaiian history and arts. Many residents regard the museum and its staff as the premier repositories and ambassadors for Kaua`i`s rich heritage. They have earned this respect because they themselves live it. When the Museum hosted the annual Archaeology Week conclave in October, Director Carol Lovell and her associates planned several days of field trips to archaeological sites. Because these places contain ancestral mana, Museum staff wanted to ensure that field trip participants would behave themselves properly. They therefore invited Roselle to teach protocol to those who signed up for the trips and to anyone else interested in learning about this important aspect of Hawaiian culture. Since Roselle could not be on Kaua`i for October 1, she asked her senior students to conduct the workshop. Keahi, Keakawaiola, Moanikeala, and Heu`ionalani did the job. About 50 people, including Hawaiian studies teachers from Kaua`i Community College, halau members, Hawaiian immersion students, and visitors, attended this lively and informative event. Dale Rosenfeld videotaped the workshop for Ho`ike public television, and her video will be broadcast. (As of 1 January, we do not yet know when that broadcast will occur. If you would like to inquire, you can telephone the station at 246 1556.) Kaua`i Museum also plans to sell copies of Dale’s program, so if you would like to buy one, stop by the museum gift...
Halau members greet competitors in the Kaua`i World Challenge Canoe Race in Kalapaki

Halau members greet competitors in the Kaua`i World Challenge Canoe Race in Kalapaki

At the invitation of race organizers, halau members greeted competitors in the Kaua`i World Challenge Canoe Race on 7 May. The paddlers, in one-and two-seat outriggers, left Wailua early that morning, and finished at Hanapepe’s Salt Pond beach in the afternoon. Teams rotated at Hanama`ulu, Kalapaki and Koloa; this allowed competitors to rest, and made the event more visible to land-based spectators by compelling the canoes to come ashore at several points along the course. Paddlers, among them our own Sharon and Ricky Balidoy, came from as close as Hanalei and as far away as Australia and Europe, making the event worthy of its name. An international organization with Hawaiian roots, Ka `Imi was well-suited to represent the event’s host culture. Arrayed in Kane and Kanaloa colors, the halau perf- ormed marine dances such as He Mele no Kane and Aloha e ke kai o Kalalau. For many, the program’s highlight was the kahiko segment’s grand finale, Kananaka danced in the cool water of Kalapaki. The photos, taken by Jeanne George of O`ahu, capture its refreshing spirit. Thanks are due to all who made this performance exciting and fun, especially Kawai`s students, the parents who escorted them, and Fran Nestel’s fellow-singers. Good job,...
Photo Shoot with Tim Delavega at Keahualaka

Photo Shoot with Tim Delavega at Keahualaka

In preparation for the 2005 Archaeology Week, photographer Tim Delavega conducted a photo shoot of Roselle and Ka `Imi students at Keahualaka in mid-April. The Kaua`i Museum had commissioned Tim to take pictures for a poster advertising the event. Here are a few of several hundred photos, including one of the photographer himself hard at work. (We think you will be able to figure out which one he is.) The finished poster is very handsome. Kaua`i Museum gave copies to Ka `Imi members on Kaua`i, and there is one on the wall of Pu`uhinahina cabin. There may still be some posters available at the Museum gift shop, so if you would like one, stop in the shop and...
Honokowai Adventure

Honokowai Adventure

by Petra Sittel hono = bay, gulch, valley; as a part of place names such a Honolulu, Honokohau, Honoli´i, Honomanu; kowai = bay of waters, waters that brake their way through the valley, wind borne waters, fulfillment; A long time ago Honokowai belonged to the district of Hono- bays that were owned by chief Pi´ilani. He ruled the bays on Maui, Moloka´i and Lana´i that were visible from Lahaina (M.Kawena Pukui). During the sugar cane era on Maui all streams of the vallies were used to water the plantation lands above the vallies. After the sugar cane industry went down the land has been sold. Since 8 years now there has been an ongoing open discussion between Hawaiians that feel responsible for their ancestors´ lands and the new owners how the land will be divided into parcels and sold as agricultural lots. That implies, how to preserve Hawaiian ancient sites on the property, open the land to public, etc.. Roselle took us to one of those meetings. It was very interesting to study all the human beings gathered and how they were very friendly with one another and had great sushi and KFC snacks, trying to find solutions for their different approaches and interests….. At the end of that meeting, I was almost a frozen ice cube, Roselle´s brother Ed Lindsey asked for support and ideas on funding money to buy their own tree chipper machine. I wondered for what he needed a tree chipper?! I should have an answer to this question a few days later. We met with Ed, Puanani, their dog Kaea, Andy and a young...
Koke`e Kumu Class

Koke`e Kumu Class

It was an exciting weekend at Pu`uhinahina. Joining Roselle and the kumu class (Keakawaiola, Moanikeala, Hi`ipoi, Keanuenue, Keahi, and Heu`ionalani), were three members of a crew from National Public Radio. Stephanie, Maureen, and Edie were preparing a program for a series on women in leadership. To gather material for the segment that will feature Roselle, the crew interviewed her and the students individually and collectively. They also listened to spontaneous mele and hula, ate, hiked, and generally made themselves at home with the halau. As it happened, they had chosen an especially active time for their visit. Besides the kumu class, Pu`uhinahina hosted a rehearsal for the 28 August Washington, D.C. performance and a short practice for a program that Keahi, Moanikeala, and Heu`ionalani presented at the 16 August memorial for Pila Kikuchi. The students also chanted, sang, and danced at a family memorial gathering at Koke`e park on Sunday, 10 August. Stephanie and her collaborators attended this event, recording some of the oli and mele. All too soon, it was time for them to pack their cameras, recorders, and memories down the mountain and off to the...
Kahiko Ha Lapa I Hula Alapa`i Hoike

Kahiko Ha Lapa I Hula Alapa`i Hoike

This year’s hoike was held at the beautiful National Botanical Gardens in Lawai. Early Saturday morning Toni, Kawai’s husband, his friends and halau-members prepared the ground and put up tents under a shady Monkeypot Tree. Soon many family members arrived, including our special guests Roselle and Jim Bailey from Maui, and two of their grandsons from Samoa. Our Kahiko program began with a formal genealogy-chant, followed by the entrance-dance for the dancers and ‘Auhea Wale Ana Ho’i Oe E Ka Wai Ilihai Onaona’, invoking Ka`ahumanu, the great chiefess of Maui, who counted among her several husbands King Kamehameha I. In ‘Aia I Ka Maile Ko Lei Nani’, a hula noho, we honored Kaumuali`i’s descendant Kapi`olani. Until as recently as the early twentieth century, people of Kaua`i’s Na Pali region celebrated visits from high chiefs by hurling flaming logs of light woods like hau and papala from Makana, Kamaile and other pinnacles. This dance dramatized that greeting ceremony. With the lament of ‘Ke Kanikau Na Kiamanu O Moloka’i’ we told the story about the extinction of the native birds like the `o`onumuku from which the Moloka`i kiamanu (bird-catchers) derived their living. It also laments the greed and stupidity of the kiamanu themselves, who, in the mid nineteenth century, discovered how much more convenient it was to shoot the birds with the kikapu (rifle), rather to catch them in the time-consuming and inefficient ways of old – ways that had allowed the numbers of birds and bird-catchers to remain stable for generations. Too late the kiamanu realized what they had done. Encoded in this sad mele is a promise that, when...
Friendship Force Performance

Friendship Force Performance

An organization which has long been connected with Ka ‘Imi is the Friendship Force of Kaua’i. One branch of the global peace initiative called Friendship Force International, this group shares the ideal which we express in the phrase “lulu ka maile”, scatter the seeds of love far and wide. Dedicated to establishing peace by building friendships between people of different nations and cultures, Friendship Force’s slogan is “a world of friends is a world of peace.” To establish these friendships, the organization’s headquarters in Atlanta, Georgia, USA arranges home stay visits among its many clubs around the planet. Usually the visitors, or ambassadors in Friendship Force lingo, spend a week with a host club. Sharing their hosts’ daily lives, they see their nation and culture from the inside, not through tourist promotions or media presentations. This personal contact should make them less prone to stereotype or demonize a country and its people. Friends may disagree while still remaining friends; they are less likely to resort to violence as a means of settling disagreements. By providing the seeds of love an opportunity to grow, Friendship Force hopes to make the world a garden of peace. Does it sound too good to be true? Ask any of the Kaua’i group’s long-time members, and you will hear about friendships that have far outlasted the week’s visit. In the 19 years since the local club’s establishment, members have hosted people from Brazil, Taiwan, England, New Zealand, Germany, Korea etc. Long after the official exchange has ended, people continue to correspond, send gifts, and visit one another. The network spreads even wider. For example,...
At Keahualaka

At Keahualaka

On February 15, 2003, members of Halau Kahiko Ha Lapa I Hula Alapa`i and Ha`awi Hemolele O Keakawaiola came together with our Kumu, Roselle Keliihonipua Bailey to share with a group of Healing Touch practitioners from West Michigan our mana’o of the chants and kahiko dances at Keahualaka. The group had requested to have an experience at this sacred place because many of them had been moved by the experience they had there during the Healing Touch International Conference in 2000. That year Roselle had led a workshop at Keahualaka. Her teaching and chanting brought tears to many of the participants as they connected with the sacred energy there at that time. This time the group made a generous donation to Kaimi…..It was a joyful and educational experience for...