Ka’imi’s program at Eo Emalani 2016

Ka’imi’s program at Eo Emalani 2016

Our Kumu as Master of Ceremonies Sailing in on the canoe! The day could hardly have been more favorable: blue sky, warm sun moderated by the occasional breeze, Kanaloahuluhulu meadow dressed in glorious green… You can get the visual imagery from Mike Teruya’s photographs, and your imagination/memory will supply sounds, scents, and general atmosphere. For those who were not there, or who did not get copies of the printed program, here is the text explaining Ka `Imi’s performance: We are all navigators. Everyone here today used navigation to reach Koke`e, even if only to go out the door and into a vehicle that someone else drove. Navigation or wayfinding is something we all do, often without thinking much about it. Polynesians, however, refined the process into science and art. Using natural signs such as winds, clouds, birds, waves, and stars, they explored and colonized many islands throughout the vast Pacific, including Hawaii, Tahiti, New Zealand. Surpassing the Chinese, Phonecians, Arabs, and Vikings, they became the finest seafarers of the pre-modern world. Our program today salutes them and their present-day descendants. We enter singing about sailing in search of a dream. The song comes from Taumako, a small Polynesian community in the eastern Solomon Islands, whose people still build and sail the kind of canoes their ancestors used to travel the ancient searoads. We then perform a hula kala`au (stick dance) from Kauai which describes astronomical and other navigational signs. A song honoring Queen Emma as a warrior who braved the deep ocean to travel within her kingdom and to North America and Europe follows. Our last dance brings us...
‘Hawaiian style’ lesson plans DVD soon to be released; Ka `Imi Institute continues global cultural exchange

‘Hawaiian style’ lesson plans DVD soon to be released; Ka `Imi Institute continues global cultural exchange

  Members of Ka `Imi Na`auao o Hawai`i Nei Institute are pleased to announce the upcoming release of a teaching video and series of lesson plans, “He Mele no Kane; Hawaiians as Scientists.” This innovative teaching tool promotes cultural learning through films and photographs of traditional chant and hula combined with related lesson plans geared to the classroom. Appropriate for elementary through middle school grades, the DVD will be made available this fall as part of the continuing educational mission of Ka `Imi Na`auao o Hawai`i Nei Institute. Additional advanced lesson plans for high school and advanced levels will follow. School principals, teachers and cultural leaders, librarians adding to Hawaiian resource materials, as well as anyone interested in furthering their understanding of Hawaiian conceptual knowledge may contact the Institute to reserve advance copies of this educational tool. Ka `Imi is a non-profit 501-C3 educational institute that has been in existence since the 1970s. The purchase price of the DVD and lesson plans will be nominal. The “Hawaiians as Scientists” educational project grew out of the successful Ka `Imi staged hula chronicles of “Recalling Hawai`i,” choreographed and directed by Kumu Hula Bailey. Starring casts numbered up to 50 dancers and musicians of the Institute, hailing from school branches world-wide. The crowd-pleasing multi-media spectacular has proven its success in each of eight presentations to date, from Germany and Switzerland (2010), to Kaua`i (2011), Maui (2012), Hawai`i and O`ahu (2013), as well as Northern California (2014).   Following the Hilo Theater presentation, Brenda Lee, a Hawaiian activist, said, “Every school child in Hawai`i should have the opportunity to see and learn from...
Ka ’Imi in Geneva: Reception at the U.S. Mission Independance Day 2015

Ka ’Imi in Geneva: Reception at the U.S. Mission Independance Day 2015

Dancers of Ka ’Imi Switzerland, Germany and Austria performed at the permanent U.S. Mission to the United Nations in Geneva, Switzerland on July 7th 2015, on occasion of the celebration of Independence Day 2015. The theme of this afternoon was Hawaii and the “Aloha Spirit”. Ambassador Pamela Hamamoto (grown up in Hawaii) invited the Band Na Ohana Ho’aloha from Moloka’i to play for the reception and suggested that a Swiss Hula Halau should participate to make the connection to the guest country and to enhance cultural exchange. Ka ’Imi picked up the invitation and participated with dancers not only Switzerland but also from our German and Austrian Halau. Manja from Switzerland and Anna from Germany visited the band on Moloka’i in February 2015 and got a first taste of dancing with the group during one of their weekly shows at the Paddlers Inn. After a lot of preparation we all met in Geneva on Sunday July 5th starting rehearsing in extreme summer heat. Everybody put their full effort into getting the dances tuned up, making leis for us, for guests of honor as well as for some of the U.S. Mission staff. Monday July 6th we went to the U.S. Mission to rehearse with the band. We only had this one day to get to know each other, finding the same rhythm, pick the right versions of the songs, agree on verses, beginnings and endings. It was an intense and exhausting rehearsal. But it was worth it: The next day nobody could believe that this was the first time we all met and played and danced together. The staff...
Hula Alapa‘i i Noho i Kuali‘i of Oahu celebrates 25th Anniversary

Hula Alapa‘i i Noho i Kuali‘i of Oahu celebrates 25th Anniversary

Our O‘ahu hālau observed its 25th anniversary on July 13, 2014.  Featured were favorite kahiko and ‘auwana hula by keiki and makua classes.  Most of these hulas come from Ka ‘Imiʻs shared repertoire.  Others, such as the keikiʻs “Toad Song” and “Ūlili E”, and the mākuaʻs “Kaleohano” and “Alekoki”, were created by Hi‘ipoi.  One of the joys of this year has been witnessing the pleasure and pride of older beginner adults who have always wanted to dance hula, but never did until this past year! Kamal`i Stately “Kaulilua” danced by mākua and ‘ōpio “Pua ka ‘Ōhelo” “Puamana” danced by mākua and kūpuna “Toad” song “Kaleohano”...
Recalling Hawai’i – Europe 2010

Recalling Hawai’i – Europe 2010

Traveling and Dancing in Germany and Switzerland June 2010 Submitted by Savitri “Kama” Kumaran  Click here for a flickr photo gallery “Where do we go next?” Whenever the members of Kaimi have traveled this is the question that is asked at the end of the trip! We asked this question when we had completed our trip to Germany in 2004. “India” was the answer! We asked this question again when we completed our wonderful trip to Tamil Nadu, India in 2007. “The Castle in Heidelberg” was the answer! Therefore in early June, 2010, thirty one of us embarked on a journey to Germany and Switzerland. Many months were spent in preparation. The kumu, dancers, speakers, and hosts in Germany and Switzerland organized, practiced and communicated with each other regularly. We came from Oahu, Maui and Kauai and met in Heidelberg, Germany. The Program “Recalling Hawai`I” was to be performed in Heidelberg and Augsberg, Germany and in Basel, Switzerland. Our photo journal tells the story of the practices (many!), preparations for the performances, and the fun we had as we lived, ate, and travelled as one big, happy family for two weeks. Following you will see an article about our program from Augsberg, Germany and impressions of the experience shared by just a few of the participants. The program is a  multimedia experience which includes chants, dances, images, music, song and narration. This is the translation of the information printed on the Geman Halau website :  www.hula.de The hula performance includes a journey from the dawn of time until now, from the Hawaiian point of view – it is a...
Hula-Night in the Restaurant Sternen, Mauss, Switzerland

Hula-Night in the Restaurant Sternen, Mauss, Switzerland

The Beginning Twice a year our Kumu Hula Roselle Bailey comes to Mauss near Berne to teach us hula. The classes take place in the Restaurant Sternen, run by Beat Wisler and Maik Hoppler. About one year ago Roselle and Jim her husband, came up with the idea that we could organize a hula-evening in Mauss to show our gratitude to Beat and Maik for their cooperative and very friendly way of taking care of us during the past years. Shortly after the idea is presented to Beat and Maik, a date is set and things start rolling. Roselle sends three cookbooks with Polinesian recipies and helps us to put together our dancing programme. Beat will create a three course Polinesian buffet out of his new cookbooks. We organize ourselves for practicing, practicing, practicing. The Day Beautiful sunshine wakes us up Saturday morning. The weather is stunning and stable – it is hot and dry, which is certainly not obvious in Switzerland! After breakfast in the garden we start making the flower leis and then later meet the rest of the group at the Sternen, where there is more practicing, organizing and defining our outdoor “dancefloor”, practicing to walk in and out of stage, installing microphones and music etc. etc. It’s fun and at the same time there is a lot of concentration and focus and increasing nervousness and excitement. The Performance Beat and Maik serve us some food early so when the first guests arrive we’re ready to go and get dressed and prepared. – Then: time to perform! – After greeting the guests and giving a short...
Roselle’s Spring Seminar 2008 in Mauss, Switzerland

Roselle’s Spring Seminar 2008 in Mauss, Switzerland

This year the seminar started with a lecture by Roselle on Ho’oponopono– a tradtitional way of dealing with conflicts in Hawaii. Usually, the first 3 days of the Hula-seminar are dedicated to the beginners. However, as this time all the participants had already taken at least one seminar with our Kumu Roselle Keli’ihonopua Bailey, already the first morning starts with chanting and pule. Then Roselle moves straight on into reviewing the dances we learnt  during the previous seminars. She corrects the mistakes, which had creeped in (how is this always happening?) and refines our movements. We are in high spirits, urging for action and laughing a lot. As usual, the second part of the seminar is for the advanced dancers. We are also learning new dances and this “Maile Swing” is a real challenge for us! Roselle brought Keahi with her, one of the hula teachers she trained in Kaua’i. Keahi is supporting Roselle and gaining experiences for herself and her own teaching. It is really a gift to have her here. The first days we eat at the Restaurant Sternen in Mauss, where we also dance and are spoilt by the team of the Sternen, thanks a lot! The last 2 days  Gérard’s excellent kitchen is exciting us at Christina’s and Rolf’s place. Thank you for your hospitality. On the last afternoon the usual Hō‘ike is held for friends and for our families – of course with “Maile Swing”. The audience is laughing kindly at our mistakes and applauding excitedly. As always, the days of the seminar are over far too quickly.  We are going home with manifold...
Performing of Swiss Halau Hula Alapa’i I Ka Leo Mai

Performing of Swiss Halau Hula Alapa’i I Ka Leo Mai

Performing of the Swiss Halau Hula Alapa’i I Ka Leo Mai – “Fire and Ice” Swiss Bankers meet the fire of Hawai’i on an Annual  Meeting in Wallbach, Switzerland,  in November 2007 The subject of the invitation to the bankers was “Fire and Ice” and our Halau was engaged to bring in the fire of Hawaii. Switzerland is famous for its glaciers and well-known as watercastle of Europe.  Therefore, ice is deeply anchored in the consciousness of Swiss people. However, in the cold season many people are longing for light and warm temperatures. Thus, as a contrast to the cold and the ice, the fire of Hawai’i should ligthen up and warm the hearts of the people participating in the meeting. That is the reason why Roselle Bailey, our Kumu Hula chose the dances for our hula performance under the aspect of fire. The fire was sparkling – the manager of the Restaurant Schiff in Wallbach for example was very enthusiastic about the great variety of the dances, our abilities and the intensity of the presentation. We were happy and proud to give some Swiss people the chance of getting to know part of the Hawai’ian culture a little closer. As dancers we could fill our own hearts with some of the fire and the heat and take it back home with...

A South India Adventure

A South India adventure: The ‘Dance Hula, Dance!’ cast, a high voltage group on the move. by Dawn Fraser Kawahara, C. May 2007 The energy crackled through us as we boarded our China Airlines flight from Honolulu to Taipei. Despite the early departure and lengthy flights, the group voltage didn’t diminish across the date line all the way forward to Bangkok, and after a brief tour in Thailand, arrival in Chennai, formerly known as Madras. Hula and instruments enlivened the layover and pre-boarding time for us and for other waiting passengers. These impromptu “fun” hula times drew attention, interest, and some would-be dancers who jumped right in… Even if we weren’t dancing and singing and strumming, just lining up for the inevitable security scans and checks, clustered around hand-carried instruments, implements and baggage, or lolling and resting in our seats, our matching diamond-patterned halau shirts multiplied by 20 and friendly chatter drew attention to us as a “troupe” from Hawai`i–dancers, musicians and helpers on the move. More than that, our tour was made all the more memorable because we were a bonded group of friends respectful of each other and all committed to furthering the excitement and “the truth of ancient hula” under the long-time guidance of Ka `Imi director Roselle Keli`ihonipua Bailey, our respected Kumu Hula and friend. Besides sharing Hawaiian culture and aloha spirit through hula and teaching, we had a mission in mind: bringing helpful goods and learning aids in the spirit of friendship and respect to the very needy children of Imayam School. This, as well as our lodging in destination Tuticorin, were set through...
Performance at cure season opening at Bad Durkheim

Performance at cure season opening at Bad Durkheim

After our successful performance at the cure season opening at Bad Durkheim in 2005, our halau Noho ka manawa i Hula alapa’i was again asked to perform at the opening on the 1st Mai 2006. Our group of six dancers – Andrea, Evelyn, Gabi, Karin, Pauline and Stefanie – took the audience on a trip over the different hawaiian islands. We performed Hukilau, Puamana, Makee ailana, Pu’u anahulu, He nani ka ala and Song of old Hawai’i. The audience enjoyed our dancing and looked forward to the second part of our performance. After a short break we continued our program with love songs like Papalina lahilahi, Hawaiian Hospitality, Hula Girl, Green Rose Hula and Moonlight Lady. We closed our program with a lovesong to the Aina – This is Hawai’i. The audience was very interested and asked us several questions about Hula. Afterwards the director of the medical cure center thanked us for our performance. Noho ka manawa i Hula alapa’i, Germany, July...
Performance of Noho ka Manawa i Hula Alapa’i at Bad Durkheim

Performance of Noho ka Manawa i Hula Alapa’i at Bad Durkheim

May 1, 2005: Noho ka Manawa I Hula Alapa’i had two performances at the opening of the cure season at Bad Durkheim, a city close to Mannheim. Karin was contacted by a lady who was in the organisation team of that opening event. She watched the Ka Imi performance at Mannheim Luisenpark in 2004 and was very impressed. So she asked us to perform at the cure season opening event. We had two performances of 20 minutes each. The subject of our 1st performance was Hollywood and dances of that period of time. In order to give an introduction, we started with a small story, which we created in order to explain the most common gestures for landscapes, the elements and people. We wore our grass skirts and rafia kupe’e while we performed Hukilau Song, Song of old Hawai’i, Green Rose Hula, He Nani ka ala and This is Hawai’i. The people were very pleased by the performance. Most of them had never seen Hula before. When we were walking through the cure park in our grass skirts, we attracted a lot of people who wanted to make fotos of or with us. During our 2nd performance we danced modern Hulas like Hawaiian Hospitality, Papalina Lahilahi, Ke ala ka’u i honi, Pua Mana and Kamali’i o ka po. We got a very positive feedback by the audience as well as the lady of the organisation team and the director of the spa. Back at home we watched the video tape of the performances, one of our husbands made. On that tape we could hear a small child sing “lae...
Ka`Imi Na`auao O Hawaii Nei in Germany

Ka`Imi Na`auao O Hawaii Nei in Germany

“O Vater Himmel, O Mutter Erde, hier sind wir!” (O Father Heaven, O Mother Earth, here are we!’) “Aloha tatou, e no kupuna! Eio kou puropura mai Hawai”i mai.” (Let love flow between us, o ancient ones! Here are your descendents from Hawai’i.) As if in acknowledgement, the somber walls of Heidelberg’s Thingstaette echoed these greetings, chanted in German and Hawaiian by students of Ka ‘Imi No’ auoo o Hawai’i Nei. It was 24 July, 2004, a day for which Roselle Bailey and the members of her organization had been preparing for four years. The process began when Mrs. Bailey first visited the site in 2000. Built during the early years of Nazi rule, the 8000-seat open-air theatre on Heidelberg’s Heiligenberg was one of a series of similar structures throughout Germany. Though completing only 40, Adolph Hitler had grandly planned to construct 1500, which he intended to use as sites for political assemblies. The various Thingstoetten which remain display many of the best qualities of 20th century German architecture. Designed according to ancient Greek principles, they feature excellent acoustics and expansive stages. This makes them fine venues for performing arts of all kinds. However, association of these places with Nazism has made Germans of today squeamish about using them. Consequently, people show them little respect. In Heidelberg’s Thingstoette, for example, weeds sprout from the seats, and displaced stones lie forlornly on the stage. So much broken glass litters the area that Ka’Imi’s dancers had to wear ballet slippers to protect their feet. Why, then, would a Hawaiian cultural organization want to have anything to do with such a spot,...
Performances of Luana Na Manu I Hula Alapa`i A Berlin

Performances of Luana Na Manu I Hula Alapa`i A Berlin

Report: Performances of Luana Na Manu I Hula Alapa’I A Berlin at the “Henry Berger Anniversary”, Coswig, “Long Night of Science and Humanities” and “Worlds in Motion”, Berlin, June 2004 Our Hula Calendar was dominated by three memorable events in June 2004: our performance at the Henry Berger Anniversary Celebration in Coswig on June 26th and the weekend of June 12th and 13th with two events in Berlin, the “Long Night of Science and Humanities” and the “Worlds in Motion” international dance festival. To commemorate the passing of Henry Berger 75 Years ago, his hometown of Coswig, Germany (about 1.5 hours drive southwest of Berlin) had organized a two day event to which we were asked to perform as the only Halau Hula. Other performers included the youth dance group “Eamanu Tamariki” from Atiu (Cook Islands), Choirs, a classical orchestra and the local gun club’s brass band. To our exceptional surprise and pleasure we learned upon arriving in Coswig that two world class Hawaiian musicians would accompany our dances: Mr. Aaron Mahi of the “Royal Hawaiian Band” and his friend, singer at the Opera in Honolulu, Mr. Dean. We already were happy to have two friends from Berlin play for us, professional musicians Lansinga and Michael. The spontaneous rehearsal we improvised in the still empty beer tent was greatly enjoyed by everyone taking part. We couldn’t help but marvel at the sensitivity and graciousness these professionals showed us amateurs by following our tempo and filling our requests for old standards without even blinking. Dancing on stage at the historical monastery were: Anna, Beth, Edna, Luana, Merle, Sabine, Silke, Sonja...
Report of a Performance in Berlin by Stefanie Ibendorf

Report of a Performance in Berlin by Stefanie Ibendorf

Report of performance at „Behindertenbegegnungsstätte“ in Berlin (organisation / meeting point for handicapped people), 23rd November 2003 Luana invited me to join the performance of Luana Na Manu I Hula Alapai A Berlin at „Behindertenbegegnungsstätte“ in Berlin, since I spent that weekend in Potsdam. The „Behindertenbegegnungsstätte“, which is a place where people with handicaps can meet, have workshops etc., organises regular events with specific subjects, for example foreign countries with their culture. That afternoon their subject was south sea. After the people had coffee togther and watched a video about polynesian culture, our performance started: On that dark winter afternoon, Luana started to rise the sun in the minds of the people with E Ala E. She aks the audience to clap their hands together with her and they did quiet well. Then we dancers went in with Ku Ka Punoho. During the following first part of the performance we danced Huki Ike Kalo, Haaheo O Hana, Heia, Kawika and Papalina Lahilahi. Some of the dancers had their first performance and they did very well. In between the dances Luana talked about their content and meaning. She let the people guess the gestures of Huki Ike Kalo, which was great fun for them. The audience payed great attention to the story of Haloa and laughed out loud when Launa came to the point in Heia, where Kalakaua felt from his surfboard into the ocean. They enjoyed all the stories arround the dances very much. Luana, Edna and Silke had to change their dresses for the last two dances. Since I’m not familiar with Aloha Kaua’i and I did not...
HULA WORKSHOP with Roselle K. Bailey

HULA WORKSHOP with Roselle K. Bailey

Theme: Hawaiian Culture and Dances Present: Luana Baumann, Stefanie Ibendorf-Schmidt, Karin Jung, Edna Krüger, Angela Pick, Gerlinde Albrecht, Silke Rohr, Jean Everett, Margret Rockwitz, Andrea Kandler, Renée Haumann, Gabi Semmel. This is the first time that most of Roselle’s Hula students in Germany came together to continue learning the culture and dances of Hawaii. Following were the activities during the workshop: • Chanting and ‘Pule’ before and after the days’ activities • Intensive hip and foot-work training • Dancing – Kahea – Singing • Learning the valuable words of Hawaiian culture • Ukulele & Guitar Playing • Sharing and exchanging ideas, knowledge and abilities • Announcement and planning for the Hula Concert in Heidelberg (24th July 2004) • Ho’ike (performance done at end of the seminar to show what we have learned)   Extra Activities such as: • Composing own music and dancing Hula style • Lei making Intensive hip and foot-work training Everyday through out the workshop Roselle starts the class with intensive hip and foot-work training to make sure that our hips move the way it should be, steps are clearly done and proper body posture is assured. Very important in dancing Hula.  Proper way on doing the sitting or standing position in between dances (through the beat of the IPU) New dances were taught and old dances were intensively reviewed and corrections were made. In some cases some additional dance-steps were created to adjust to the rhythm of the music version. One dance we learned is beating the Ipu at the same time as the normal steps and hip movements. At first it felt like its...

Report of Hula Seminar in Kassel

Some of Roselle‘s “older” students and I decided to participate already the beginners workshop which took place 28th – 30th September. We thought it would be good for us to practise the basics, too.  After the introduction and a worm up phase with basics, Roselle split us into several small groups. One or two experienced students had to work with three or four beginners. We had to teach the beginners “Song of old Hawai’i”. From my point of view it was on the one hand very exhausting, but a good experience and our group had a lot of fun. Gabi and I shared the job to teach one group, so that every one of us had to watch and correct only two persons. Now we can imagine what it means to stand in front of a large group of maybe 20 students and have an eye on every person, and dance mirrored, and play music and sing all the time and … This needs a lot of experience. The second good experience for me was, that we had to sing „Song of old Hawai’i“ the whole day again and again – I think, I never sung that much before. I had no chance to sing soft and hide behind someone else’s voice. After „Song of old Hawai’i“ Roselle taught us together „E Lili’u E“. Of course every morning started with chanting and pule and we closed that way in the evening. Every day after dinner we students came together and practised chants like „Oli Kahea“, „E Homai“ and the „Willkommen“ song together with the beginners. On the 30th September...

Carneval of Cultures in Berlin

Dear Friends! The Karneval der Kulturen parade was hard work: Dancing in the hot sun for hours…. (Actually I didn’t make it and dropped down soon, but the other ladies were doing fine all the time). We combined forces with other Polynesians and their families. So our contribution was Papalina and Anapau. We learned some Cook Island, Samoan and Tongaen dances – but the most astonishing feature were the husbands and sons of the Polynesian ladies: They had practiced hard to perform the Haka. They really did well and the audience appreciated it very much. Only a week later we went to the Bewegte Welten (Worlds moving) Event: Many dancing groups representing all parts of the world. The most special part of this event were the Tileaf Skirts: Almost everybody questioned us to where we had those skirts from and we were extremely proud of them. Thank you all so much for having showed your love and helpfulness by making and sending these skirts. Our next task was the Polynesian Festival in Sachsenbrunn. This was more like a big family gathering and party, our educational goals were somehow out of place here, but we tried our best and performed Huki ike kalo, Ha’aheo O Hana, Kawika and Ula no weo, later we also did Papalina, Ka Paniolo Nui O Moloka’i, Ho’ola Lahui Hawaii and Aloha Kaua’i. Today Sonja, one of the Halau members asked us to perform at a Qigong Congress. The theme of the conference is Mother Earth, so we’ll do Papalina, Anapau and Ho’ola Lahui Hawai’i. I’m looking forward to seeing at least some of you soon...