Ka’imi’s program at Eo Emalani 2016

Ka’imi’s program at Eo Emalani 2016

Our Kumu as Master of Ceremonies Sailing in on the canoe! The day could hardly have been more favorable: blue sky, warm sun moderated by the occasional breeze, Kanaloahuluhulu meadow dressed in glorious green… You can get the visual imagery from Mike Teruya’s photographs, and your imagination/memory will supply sounds, scents, and general atmosphere. For those who were not there, or who did not get copies of the printed program, here is the text explaining Ka `Imi’s performance: We are all navigators. Everyone here today used navigation to reach Koke`e, even if only to go out the door and into a vehicle that someone else drove. Navigation or wayfinding is something we all do, often without thinking much about it. Polynesians, however, refined the process into science and art. Using natural signs such as winds, clouds, birds, waves, and stars, they explored and colonized many islands throughout the vast Pacific, including Hawaii, Tahiti, New Zealand. Surpassing the Chinese, Phonecians, Arabs, and Vikings, they became the finest seafarers of the pre-modern world. Our program today salutes them and their present-day descendants. We enter singing about sailing in search of a dream. The song comes from Taumako, a small Polynesian community in the eastern Solomon Islands, whose people still build and sail the kind of canoes their ancestors used to travel the ancient searoads. We then perform a hula kala`au (stick dance) from Kauai which describes astronomical and other navigational signs. A song honoring Queen Emma as a warrior who braved the deep ocean to travel within her kingdom and to North America and Europe follows. Our last dance brings us...
‘Hawaiians as Scientists’ DVD Fall Educators’ Special

‘Hawaiians as Scientists’ DVD Fall Educators’ Special

A working kalo (taro) and more eco-farm is dependent on a steady, fresh water supply channeled and routed from source streams in the traditional cultural way.   Photo by Dawn F. Kawahara Kapa`a, Hawai`i–School is in full swing now, the autumn equinox arrived Sept. 22, and the rainy season will soon be upon us, relieving areas of drought and dryness and renewing the life of the land. Members of the educational committee of Ka `Imi Na`auao o Hawai`i Nei Institute are reaching out to school principals, teachers, cultural and club leaders, and librarians to announce a fall semester “Educators’ Special” for the non-profit cultural Institute’s DVD and study guide, “Hawaiians as Scientists, He Mele No Kane (The Waters of Kane).” This innovative teaching tool on the importance of the water cycle in nature was carefully planned as a ready-to-use lesson plan. The “hands-on” units require observation and critical thinking. The Ka `Imi-produced teaching-and-learning product describes the water cycle as illustrated by the traditional Hawaiian chant illustrating “The Waters of Kane.” It includes a comprehensive lecture on the importance of fresh water streams and animals throughout the natural cycle by Kaua`i District Aquatic Biologist Donald Heacock. Ka `Imi students of the Maui branch school were filmed for the chant segment in natural settings, mauka to makai (mountains to sea). The lecture was filmed at a working kalo (taro) farm. The material is geared to elementary through middle school classes and beyond, to life learners. Regularly $25, the cost to educators (which includes cultural and organizational leaders and librarians) will be $15 per copy. The idea of offering the DVD Educators’ Special...
‘Hawaiian style’ lesson plans DVD soon to be released; Ka `Imi Institute continues global cultural exchange

‘Hawaiian style’ lesson plans DVD soon to be released; Ka `Imi Institute continues global cultural exchange

  Members of Ka `Imi Na`auao o Hawai`i Nei Institute are pleased to announce the upcoming release of a teaching video and series of lesson plans, “He Mele no Kane; Hawaiians as Scientists.” This innovative teaching tool promotes cultural learning through films and photographs of traditional chant and hula combined with related lesson plans geared to the classroom. Appropriate for elementary through middle school grades, the DVD will be made available this fall as part of the continuing educational mission of Ka `Imi Na`auao o Hawai`i Nei Institute. Additional advanced lesson plans for high school and advanced levels will follow. School principals, teachers and cultural leaders, librarians adding to Hawaiian resource materials, as well as anyone interested in furthering their understanding of Hawaiian conceptual knowledge may contact the Institute to reserve advance copies of this educational tool. Ka `Imi is a non-profit 501-C3 educational institute that has been in existence since the 1970s. The purchase price of the DVD and lesson plans will be nominal. The “Hawaiians as Scientists” educational project grew out of the successful Ka `Imi staged hula chronicles of “Recalling Hawai`i,” choreographed and directed by Kumu Hula Bailey. Starring casts numbered up to 50 dancers and musicians of the Institute, hailing from school branches world-wide. The crowd-pleasing multi-media spectacular has proven its success in each of eight presentations to date, from Germany and Switzerland (2010), to Kaua`i (2011), Maui (2012), Hawai`i and O`ahu (2013), as well as Northern California (2014).   Following the Hilo Theater presentation, Brenda Lee, a Hawaiian activist, said, “Every school child in Hawai`i should have the opportunity to see and learn from...
Maile Awards Luau

Maile Awards Luau

Members of Kaimi Na`auao O Hawaii Nei institute  joined the Malie Foundation in honoring all kumu hula on Kauai and around the world (especially those honorees on Kauai) at Smith’s Tropical Paradise in Wailua. Honorees included Ku’ulei Punu, Roselle Bailey, Kapu Kinimaka-Alquiza, Beverly Muraoka, Naomi Yokotake, Vern Kauanui, Doric Kaleonui Yaris. Click here to view the photo...
Spa Day Fundraiser

Spa Day Fundraiser

Kauai Halau members and friends partner with Vi Ganesan from Kolam to have a fun and nurturing fund raiser. Guests enjoyed hula, yoga, water exercise, nurturing massage and a sumptuous Indian feast. Thank you to all who helped to make this a wonderful day.  Click here for a flickr photo...
Evolution of the Ukulele Museum of Crafts and Folk Art

Evolution of the Ukulele Museum of Crafts and Folk Art

LEAH GARCHIK — SF Chronicle Monday, August 6, 2007 Approaching the Museum of Craft and Folk Art on Yerba Buena Lane on Thursday, you could hear the soft sounds of ukulele music from at least 15 musicians (most in Hawaiian shirts), jammed into a corner of the museum entryway, strumming together and singing “In a Canoe” in soft harmony. Inside was “Evolution of the Ukulele: The History of Hawaii’s ‘Jumping Flea,’ ” with displays of rows of handmade instruments and ukulele-themed antique sheet music. I asked exhibition curator Stephen Becker, former director of the California Historical Society and member of Ukulele Friends Ohana, which was performing and meets regularly to play and sing, whether anyone with any level of skill can join? “If you don’t play, you sing,” he said. “If you don’t sing, you cook. If you don’t cook, you wash up.” Lynn Roth did a hula as the band played another song, and when they crooned “… never more, say good-bye … ” you could close your eyes and see water lapping at the shore, palm fronds rippling. I stepped into the Lane, relishing the evocation of serenity. And directly in front of the entrance, police were interviewing a distraught woman whose purse had just been grabbed by three teen-agers. Chased by several passers-by, the bad guys had dropped her handbag, so she had it back. Officers were still roaming the neighborhood looking for the thieves. Inside, strummers strummed on. Visit www.mocfa.org for more information and to view other Ukulele events....
Roselle Bailey – A Kaua`i Living Treasure

Roselle Bailey – A Kaua`i Living Treasure

On 21 JULY, 2007, Kaua`i Museum honored its 2007 Kaua`i Living Treasures, among them was Roselle Bailey. Every two or three years, the Museum bestows this title on a small group of people whose service to the community and its culture has been outstanding. Past honorees have included archaeologist Pila Kikuchi, scholar Frances Frazier, musician Jose Bulatao, weaver Esther Makuaole and leimaker Irmalee Pomroy. Roselle came to Kaua`i on 19 May for a photo shoot at the Museum. Ever exuberant Tim Delavega took the pictures, while we took pictures of him taking pictures. You can see some of them below. View the US House of Representatives Document Commendation Letter from Hawaii Governor, Linda Lingle Tim Delavega at work. Roselle Bailey, Kauai Living Treasure 2007 Kaua`i Living Treasures Roselle and the late David Boynton’s mother. David and Pohaku Nishimitsu were post- humously awarded Living Treasure status. Each Living Treasure had a Memorabilia table. This is Roselle’s. One last practice….in the lobby just before performing. The Living Treasures onstage. Left to Right: Roselle Bailey, Linda Faye Collins, Nathan Kalama, Larry McIntosh, Aiko Nakaya The students enter with oli Aloha Tatou Students honor Roselle with dances. Roselle responds by dancing Ho’ola Lahui Hawai’i Roselle dancing as her fellow Living Treasures and her students watch. Peter Dietz escorts Roselle to and from the stage. Roselle, her family and some of the students who attended the banquet. Roselle Bailey and Grandson. Roselle Bailey’s...
Ka`Imi Member Wedding

Ka`Imi Member Wedding

Weddings were celebrated this year for two Kaimi members. Roselle led the ceremonies for both. Christopher Sutherland (K) married Irene Flack (W)  on Sunday 3 June, 2007 on  Maui. Kalaniumi H. Martin (K) married Kaiulani R. Barretto (W)  on Saturday, 27 October, 2007 on Kauai. Enjoy the celebrations in this collection of photographs thanks to Jim...
Sailing with Lata Exhibit

Sailing with Lata Exhibit

April 27, 2007 5:00pm Kaua`i Museum in Lihu`e On 27 April, 2007, members of Ka ‘Imi Na’auao o Hawai’i Nei, led by Roselle Bailey, will perform opening protocol at Kaua`i Museum for the Sailing with Lata exhibition. The exhibit is being organized to celebrate the tenth anniversary of the Vaka Taumako Project, which began in 2006. Briefly, the Vaka Taumako (a canoe for Taumako) Project was started in 1996 by the Paramount Chief of Taumako island in the eastern Solomons, Koloso Kaveia to preserve and teach the traditional canoe building and navigation skills of his people. Nga Taumako (the people of Taumako) are some of the last few Poly- nesians who still know how to build and sail long-distance voyaging canoes in the way their ancestors did. To find out more about this project, visit the Vaka Taumako section of this site, or visit www.vaka.org. Many of you know that Ka `Imi has been associated with the VTP from its inception. In September of 1997, Roselle was invited to to Taumako to bless the launching of three voyaging canoes, the first ones to have been built on the island in decades. Ka `Imi members have also helped host Taumako people who have come to Hawai`i as guests of the VTP. For this reason, the VTP have asked Ka `Imi to honor the exhibition opening with oli and mele. The celebration will take place at the Kaua`i Museum in Lihu`e at 5:00 p.m. It is a free event and open to the public. Some of you will receive invitations from Kaua`i Museum. Even if you do not, you are still...
Jessi Keakawaiola Jardin

Jessi Keakawaiola Jardin

“Jessi Lee Jardin lived a joy filled life and brought joy to everyone who knew her. Her smile, her dance, her love, her grace, her wisdom, her beauty, her generosity touched so many.  She passed away June 9, 2010 at the age of 59. She was loved by Paul, her husband, Sheanna and Gabriel her children, Sunday, her sister, Randy her brother-in-law, Devaki, her niece, Caleb and Ava, her grandchildren along with many more family and friends. Jessi was a Kumu Hula, a musician, a clothing designer, a body percussionist, a dancer, an incredible mother, an amazing friend, an inspirational teacher, a creative force in everything she did from cooking to homemaking. Her spirit shone on all of us. There will be a celebration of her beautiful life on July 25th at Omao Park.” Jessi Keakawaiola Jardin started dancing hula in 1972 under the direction of Roselle Keli’ihonipua Bailey. After her initial ‘uniki in 1979, she began teaching in ‘Oma’o from 1991 through 2005. She served as the Vice President of the Board of Directors for many years and will be greatly missed.  ...