Keauhualaka – A Door to Hawaiian Spirituality

Keauhualaka – A Door to Hawaiian Spirituality

“KEAHUALAKA- A Door to Hawaiian Spirituality” KAUAI LANDMARK FILM PREMIERE HELD ON KAUAI With permission from Dawn Kawahara/TropicBird Press Members of the Board of Ka `Imi Na`auao o Hawaii Nei Institute proudly launched the Hawaiian culture organization’s important new film documentary, “Keahualaka, A Door to Hawaiian Spirituality”, on Kauai at two well attended events. Keahualaka, an ancient place of significance, exists tucked into the cliff near Makana Peak in the Ke`e heiau complex. The first showing, a “red-carpet” invitational premiere for people who were supporters in the challenge of bringing both Ka `Imi Institute and the restoration and maintenance of Keahualaka into being, was  held on the evening of Sat., Dec. 2, 2017, at the Lihu`e Lutheran Church Hall. Over 100 people attended this event. The public film showing took place at the new Kauai Community College (KCC) small performance theater area on Dec 7, 2017. The free event was in collaboration with the KCC Hawaiian Studies program. The new theater was full to capacity for this showing. Beginning in the 1970s, Ka Imi Institute’s founder and current President Emeritus Roselle Keliihonipua Bailey held a vision of what might happen if the important archaeological site of Keahualaka were to be released from its stranglehold of non-native plants and trees and re-dedicated to Laka, the Goddess of Hula, the forest, and navigation, for which it was originally constructed in prehistoric times. Keahualaka is an important site for all of the Hawaiian islands, beyond Kauai. The work that went into freeing it from its almost forgotten state to its present and future recreated beauty and importance as an historical hula site...

Roselle F. K. Bailey’s Letter to Commission for Water Resource Management

May 29, 2007 Commission on Water Resource Management 1151 Punchbowl Street, Room 227 Honolulu, Hawaii 96813 Commissioners, Fellow Citizens, Anoai Tatou, I am Roselle Bailey living in Paukukalo, Maui.  I am representing those who have gone before me and those who have yet to come.  I shall resonate the wisdom of the ancestor’s good governance which is reflected in the Constitution of the State of Hawaii. A proverb: “Use the eyes to observe; the ears to listen; the mouth closed; then one can learn. The ancestors were wise learned leaders and managers who knew the value of observation and listening.  This skill helped prevent being caught in traps and entanglements.  They were experts in reading nature and human-nature. A proverb:  “Born was the land, born were the chiefs, born were the common people (today known as laborers).  The land, the chiefs, and the commoners belong together”. We need each other to tend the land, but the land doesn’t need us. “All public natural resources are held in trust by the state for the benefit of the people.”  At this time in history we must stand together for the life of the land!  Who do we value?  Who are we?  What can we do? A proverb: “A prophecy uttered by Kapihe, a kahuna in Kamehameha’s time” declared; “the ancient kapu will be abolished; the heiau and altars will fall; the islands will be unified; the heavens (chiefs, leaders, managers, etc.) will descend (be humbled) and the earth (the commoners, laborers) ascend (rise to positions of power”). In simple terms, we are all on the same playing board.  Now we must...
Hula – A Way of Life

Hula – A Way of Life

By Roselle F.K. Bailey 1985 “Aole pau ka ike i ka halau ho`okahi … not all knowledge is found in one school.” Under the guidance of this Hawaiian proverb, I will share with you my views of the hula as I have learned it. For most people today, the hula means a wiggle here and a motion there. That is a gross misunderstanding! Yes, the hula is a very sensuous experience, but it is also an expression of prose and poetry. In this way, it is very much like the ballet and opera. For some, hula means the dance and music of the indigenous people of Hawaii. That, too, is true, but there is more, It is the dramatization and immortalization of the Hawaiian aho (lifeline). For others it means a way to economic independence and fame. That is also true though the aka uhane (spiritual essence) is always given recognition. As a practitioner of the hula and as the leader of Kahiko Halapa`i Hula Alapa`i, a hula school, it is my responsibility to see that my students are not only adept performers but also skilled craftsmen. It is also my duty to teach them to be sensitive to their environment. Most important, I must teach them to be true to themselves, so that they may achieve the unionization of mind, body and spirit. The great question is: How does one achieve these goals in this day and age when life is very complex and fast? In the days long gone, when life was less complex and quite slow, the hula was only for a select group of people....
The Archives Of Grace

The Archives Of Grace

By Roselle F.K. Bailey A time past, breathed into life, is hula. It is a moment reflected for someone. It is the aloha (love), the `eha (pain), the pono (hope), and the hu`eu (humor) of a people. It is the survival of that people. It is the people. It is Hawai`i! As an entirely oral society, the hula provided Hawaiians a method of chronology as well as an avenue for artistry. The practitioners had the qualities of commitment, integrity and sensibility. The hula went beyond the obvious physical discipline. It also enveloped the mental, the emotional, and the spiritual well-being of its practitioners. The study of hula was neither frivolous nor was it dreary. It was, and still is, a joy. In spite of its attacks and attackers, the hula has managed to survive! This very survival is a display of the vitality and tenacious quality of hula. It is the heartbeat of Hawai`i; it is the soul of her people. He`olelo no`eau, a proverb: “Makahana ka `ike”; only when one actually does the work can one come to know and understand the profession. There are only two islands that have survived the tests of time where one can actually touch the magnitude of antiquity of the hula halls. One of these is Moloka`i; Ka`ana, Moloka`i to be exact, where, under strict discipline, Kapo`ulakina`u taught Nawahineli`ili`i (also known as Kewelani, also known as Loea, also known as Ulunui, also known as Laka, …) the hula. The only other island is Kaua`i. Ah, Kaua`i of the heavens; Kaua`i full of age; Kaua`i the abundant; Kaua`i the desired; Kaua`i so serene...