21st Annual Eo Emalani i Alaka`i Festival in Kokee

21st Annual Eo Emalani i Alaka`i Festival in Kokee

21st Annual Eo Emalani i Alaka`i Festival in Kokee: October 10, 2009 Ka `Imi Institute kumu and haumana and from four branches of the halau combined to perform at the 21st annual Eo Emalani i Alaka`i Festival in Kanaloahuluhulu Meadow, Koke`e on October 10, 2009.  The program featured stories, poetry, songs and dances relating to Queen Emma’s visit to the estate of Alfred, Lord Tennyson on the Isle of Wight, England in 1865. EMALANI 2009 in RETROSPECT ‘You Have Instilled a Strong Foundation’by Dawn F. Kawahara a.k.a. Ke`ikeone`ulaponoThe hula year has begun along with the new year 2010, and already the October calendar is starred with forward planning to the next Ka `Imi offering for the annual Eo e Emalani i Alaka`i Festival in Koke`e. The vision is not yet fully in focus, yet it shimmers and pleases like a futuristic dream scene that beckons.As we haumana (students) practice and pay attention to the long list of small and important style details a dancer must incorporate to try to emulate the supple palapalai ferns, I think of the many festivals honoring Hawai`i’s much-loved Queen Emma in the (often) misty green meadow of Koke`e that have been staged since the first one, in 1988. How fortunate are all who have had the opportunity and pleasure of attending any or all of these festivals, and how lucky for those of us who have also presented hula to the pageants’ array of chosen Queens and their attendants. These special days span twenty-one years now and are a treasure house in my memory bank.Some Festival days have been sunny and warm, the scent...
California Ho`ike

California Ho`ike

California Ho`ike in Creekside Park in Greenbrae: June 28, 2009 California had it’s first Ho’ike, June 28th, 2009 at Creekside Park in Greenbrae. Three keiki were out of town and not able to join us. The temperature reached close to 100 degrees that day and all dancers had their water bottles close at hand. The heat kept the locals away and we had the park to ourselves. The audience of family and friends thoroughly enjoyed the performance and afterwards gathered in the shade for a well deserved pot luck...
Asian Pacific Heritage Festival

Asian Pacific Heritage Festival

Asian Pacific Heritage Festival: May 23, 2009 On May 23rd, 2009, Kahiko Ha Lapa I Hula Alapa’i O Ke Anuenue, participated in the Asian Pacific Heritage Festival at the Bay Area Discovery Museum in Sausalito. It was a particularly cold and foggy day as evidenced by the attire of the audience. We did our best to bring the warmth of the aloha spirit to the rapt audience. Kudos to the dancers for a job well done in less than optimal conditions. We hope to be invited back next year! Flicker Photo Gallery...
Aloha Africa

Aloha Africa

Aloha Africa 2009: A Rewarding Experience I am so fortunate to be able to give the gift of hula.  I have had a handful of inspiring na kumu hula (hula teachers). But, my main resource, Roselle Keli’ihonipua Bailey has been the most inspirational kumu hula in my life. I honor my teachers and their teachers before them by passing on the knowledge. This is how one keeps culture alive. Aloha Africa- a cultural exchange, the brain-child of isa Maria, has been accomplishing just that. isa Maria has made many personal sacrifices and worked persistently to bring  three Ghanaian artists to share their skills of traditional music and dance with Kaua’i. Ernest Borketey, Nii Anang and Obuobi Ashong were initially to arrive together with Mercy Fofoe Addy, a female dancer/instructor, but, because her visa application was not approved, the three men came on their own. The disappointment of Mercy’s absence became a blessing in disguise as it became an opportunity for Nii Anang to teach the traditional dances and songs of their homeland, Ghana.  With Obuobi and Ernest on musical accompaniment, as well as, the constant musical support from Kaua’i members Paul Jardin and isa Maria on drums, and I on percussion, classes were enjoyed by regular participants. Each Thursday Ernest, Nii Anang and Obuobi would come to my home for two hours of hula instruction. isa was alaka’i (lead dancer/assistant) for the class, actively supporting my instruction.   Obuobi willingly took on the role of ho’opa’a   (chanter/drummer), while Ernest and Nii Anang practiced their skills as ‘olapa {dancer}. They learned to enter the dance platform with Ho’opuka, and then, presented...
Friendship Force of Kauai Exchange with Osaka, Japan

Friendship Force of Kauai Exchange with Osaka, Japan

Friendship Force of Kauai Exchange with Osaka, Japan Ka `Imi members always enjoy their interactions with the Kaua`i branch of Friendship Force international. Since the Kaua`i club opened in 1984, Ka `Imi has helped its work to promote world peace by hosting Friendship Force Ambassadors from such diverse locales as Taiwan, New Zealand, Brazil, Germany, Japan, England, and Australia, as well as by performing for the Kaua`i club’s banquets and other functions. Most recently, our members taught Hawaiian culture to a group of Ambassadors from Osaka and Kyoto. A highlight of the group’s visit was a “Hawaiian Culture Day”, at which the Ambassadors learned lei-making, ‘ukulele, pa`u la`i construction, and a simple dance, “Huki i ke Kalo” from their hosts. We think you will be able to see from Jesse Castro’s eloquent photos how much fun was had by all. (Mahalo, Jesse, for allowing us to use the pictures.) *Anyone wanting to learn more about Friendship Force International’s program to create world peace one friendship at a time can check out the website: http://www.thefriendshipforce.org. (WARNING: make sure you type the address correctly. Do not look up http://www.friendshipforce.org unless you want to find a mail-order bride!) Osaka Friendship Force club President, Mr. Morimoto kicks up his heel learning the Molok`i Ku`i. Demonstrating good huki kalo technique. Haloa watches the Ambassadors dance in his honor. Heu`i teaching “Huki i ke Kalo” Ambassadors enjoying the hula class at “Hawaiian Culture Day”. Ambassadors posed with Ka`Imi performers at the farewell dinner in Po`ipu In a partial reprise of the Emalani program, Ka`Imi members danced “Maile Swing”. Performance in the Po`ipu Pavilion This has...
Eo, E Emalani I Alaka`i Festival

Eo, E Emalani I Alaka`i Festival

Eo, E Emalani I Alaka`i Festival, October 11, 2008 “It was the best program you ever did!” “…like a Broadway production!” “Chicken skin!” “I cried…” These were some of the comments Ka `Imi members heard from Emalani festival audience members. Reactions from our dancers, musicians, and flag holders were equally intense. “You all looked so beautiful,” exclaimed one flag bearer. It was true. Against the meadow’s dazzling green, flags and costumes shone in the sun. Solo dancers in holoku of red, yellow, purple, and pink twinkled like gemstones. Red/green ti leaf skirts swished and flashed. With just enough breeze to give them a lift, the flags’ colorful faces peeked through from behind. Words alone cannot do justice to the event. Thanks to Jim Di Mora of Kapa`a for allowing us to use his lovely photos so that you can see for yourselves how spectacular we looked. For the benefit of those who may want to know why we did what we did, we are including the text of the introduction read by faithful Emcee and distinguished kupuna Aletha Kaohi. NAME: Ka `Imi Na`auao o Hawai`i Nei Institute PRESIDENT EMERITUS AND FOUNDER: Roselle Keli`ihonipua Bailey BRANCHES: Austria, California, Germany, Kaua`i, Maui, O`ahu, Samoa, Switzerland, Virginia Lauded by her contemporaries as equal in character and accomplishment to Britain’s Queen Victoria, Emalani was an internationally known personage. In the 20 years since the Eo, E Emalani i Alaka`i Celebration was established, members of Ka `Imi Na`auao o Hawai`i Nei Institute have striven to honor her intelligence, courage, and aloha by emulation. In so doing, we too have become internationally known. Our efforts...
Hula-Night in the Restaurant Sternen, Mauss, Switzerland

Hula-Night in the Restaurant Sternen, Mauss, Switzerland

The Beginning Twice a year our Kumu Hula Roselle Bailey comes to Mauss near Berne to teach us hula. The classes take place in the Restaurant Sternen, run by Beat Wisler and Maik Hoppler. About one year ago Roselle and Jim her husband, came up with the idea that we could organize a hula-evening in Mauss to show our gratitude to Beat and Maik for their cooperative and very friendly way of taking care of us during the past years. Shortly after the idea is presented to Beat and Maik, a date is set and things start rolling. Roselle sends three cookbooks with Polinesian recipies and helps us to put together our dancing programme. Beat will create a three course Polinesian buffet out of his new cookbooks. We organize ourselves for practicing, practicing, practicing. The Day Beautiful sunshine wakes us up Saturday morning. The weather is stunning and stable – it is hot and dry, which is certainly not obvious in Switzerland! After breakfast in the garden we start making the flower leis and then later meet the rest of the group at the Sternen, where there is more practicing, organizing and defining our outdoor “dancefloor”, practicing to walk in and out of stage, installing microphones and music etc. etc. It’s fun and at the same time there is a lot of concentration and focus and increasing nervousness and excitement. The Performance Beat and Maik serve us some food early so when the first guests arrive we’re ready to go and get dressed and prepared. – Then: time to perform! – After greeting the guests and giving a short...
Re-capping “On Education & Respect”

Re-capping “On Education & Respect”

By Dawn F. Kawahara | June 2008 Published in Kauai’s Hawai`i State Teachers – Retired Newsletter 2nd Place in the National League of American Pen Women – Honolulu Branch prestigious biennial Lorin Tarr Gill Writing Competition. Copyright June 2008, Dawn F. Kawahara. Click here for the...

Members of Ka`imi Give Presentation on Visit to India

Kauai Museum ON THE MORNING OF SATURDAY, 3 MAY, AT KAUA`I MUSEUM, members of Ka`imi will give a presentation about the Institute’s visit to India in 2007.This will be one of the museum’s `Ohana Saturday programs, which take place on the first Saturday of each month. Admission is always free on those days, so this is a good opportunity for those who have seldom or never availed themselves of that institution’s many resources to become acquainted with it. If you have not seen them, check out the permanent exhibits on natural and human history in the annex. Linda Shimoda, who organizes the ‘Ohana Saturday events, has chosen the theme of “Earth, Air, Fire, Water” for this year. Other presentations in the series have included a demonstration by KCC instructor Wayne Miyata of his ceramic Chinese Bestiary, and a discussion of traditional canoe navigation by the Vaka Taumako Project. Ka `Imi’s performances in Tamil Nadu were based on the elements of Fire, Earth, Air, Water, and Spirituality, and the 3 May event will illustrate that program. Vi Herbert will also tell about the Kolam Foundation’s program to help eradicate poverty in Tamil Nadu. It was Vi who made Ka `Imi’s visit to India possible. The museum is at 4428 Rice St. Lihu’e (across from First Hawaiian Bank and the Post Office). On Saturdays, it is open from 1000 to 1600. For more information on the ‘Ohana Saturday series, telephone Linda at (808) 245 6931 ext 26. or visit the museum’s website...
Roselle’s Spring Seminar 2008 in Mauss, Switzerland

Roselle’s Spring Seminar 2008 in Mauss, Switzerland

This year the seminar started with a lecture by Roselle on Ho’oponopono– a tradtitional way of dealing with conflicts in Hawaii. Usually, the first 3 days of the Hula-seminar are dedicated to the beginners. However, as this time all the participants had already taken at least one seminar with our Kumu Roselle Keli’ihonopua Bailey, already the first morning starts with chanting and pule. Then Roselle moves straight on into reviewing the dances we learnt  during the previous seminars. She corrects the mistakes, which had creeped in (how is this always happening?) and refines our movements. We are in high spirits, urging for action and laughing a lot. As usual, the second part of the seminar is for the advanced dancers. We are also learning new dances and this “Maile Swing” is a real challenge for us! Roselle brought Keahi with her, one of the hula teachers she trained in Kaua’i. Keahi is supporting Roselle and gaining experiences for herself and her own teaching. It is really a gift to have her here. The first days we eat at the Restaurant Sternen in Mauss, where we also dance and are spoilt by the team of the Sternen, thanks a lot! The last 2 days  Gérard’s excellent kitchen is exciting us at Christina’s and Rolf’s place. Thank you for your hospitality. On the last afternoon the usual Hō‘ike is held for friends and for our families – of course with “Maile Swing”. The audience is laughing kindly at our mistakes and applauding excitedly. As always, the days of the seminar are over far too quickly.  We are going home with manifold...
Performing of Swiss Halau Hula Alapa’i I Ka Leo Mai

Performing of Swiss Halau Hula Alapa’i I Ka Leo Mai

Performing of the Swiss Halau Hula Alapa’i I Ka Leo Mai – “Fire and Ice” Swiss Bankers meet the fire of Hawai’i on an Annual  Meeting in Wallbach, Switzerland,  in November 2007 The subject of the invitation to the bankers was “Fire and Ice” and our Halau was engaged to bring in the fire of Hawaii. Switzerland is famous for its glaciers and well-known as watercastle of Europe.  Therefore, ice is deeply anchored in the consciousness of Swiss people. However, in the cold season many people are longing for light and warm temperatures. Thus, as a contrast to the cold and the ice, the fire of Hawai’i should ligthen up and warm the hearts of the people participating in the meeting. That is the reason why Roselle Bailey, our Kumu Hula chose the dances for our hula performance under the aspect of fire. The fire was sparkling – the manager of the Restaurant Schiff in Wallbach for example was very enthusiastic about the great variety of the dances, our abilities and the intensity of the presentation. We were happy and proud to give some Swiss people the chance of getting to know part of the Hawai’ian culture a little closer. As dancers we could fill our own hearts with some of the fire and the heat and take it back home with...

Letter in support of Vaka Taumako

Letter to Solomon Islands Ministry of Education in support of the Vaka Taumako Project’s application for renewal of its research permit Aloha, In 1976, for the first time in centuries, a voyaging canoe sailed from Hawai`i to Tahiti.  Its hull was fiberglass, its sails and ropes were nylon, and its navigator Micronesian.  Why?  There are two basic reasons.  First, Hawaiians no longer knew how to build and sail the kinds of canoes that had brought their ancestors from the southern Pacific.  Second, in many cases the plants that once furnished Polynesians with building materials had become either extinct or so rare as to make them no longer usable. When Captain James Cook, the first European known to have visited Hawai`i, landed there in 1778, Tahiti was no longer a place to which Hawaiians regularly sailed.  It had become part of the landscape of myth, home of gods and ancestors, a synonym for faraway.  What had changed?  How had Hawaiians and other eastern Polynesians like the Tahitians forgotten how to make the sea voyages that had enabled their forbears to cross earth’s largest ocean and colonize its remotest islands?  Why had people all over the Pacific, and especially the Polynesians, suddenly stopped making their long sea journeys at approximately the beginning of the thirteenth century C.E? No one knows the answer to that question, though theories abound.  Some Polynesian oral traditions speak of wars, famines, family feuds etc. that broke up kinship networks and communities.  Some modern scholars, noting that the end of long-distance voyaging in the Pacific roughly co-incided with the cold spell that in Europe was known as...
Evolution of the Ukulele Museum of Crafts and Folk Art

Evolution of the Ukulele Museum of Crafts and Folk Art

LEAH GARCHIK — SF Chronicle Monday, August 6, 2007 Approaching the Museum of Craft and Folk Art on Yerba Buena Lane on Thursday, you could hear the soft sounds of ukulele music from at least 15 musicians (most in Hawaiian shirts), jammed into a corner of the museum entryway, strumming together and singing “In a Canoe” in soft harmony. Inside was “Evolution of the Ukulele: The History of Hawaii’s ‘Jumping Flea,’ ” with displays of rows of handmade instruments and ukulele-themed antique sheet music. I asked exhibition curator Stephen Becker, former director of the California Historical Society and member of Ukulele Friends Ohana, which was performing and meets regularly to play and sing, whether anyone with any level of skill can join? “If you don’t play, you sing,” he said. “If you don’t sing, you cook. If you don’t cook, you wash up.” Lynn Roth did a hula as the band played another song, and when they crooned “… never more, say good-bye … ” you could close your eyes and see water lapping at the shore, palm fronds rippling. I stepped into the Lane, relishing the evocation of serenity. And directly in front of the entrance, police were interviewing a distraught woman whose purse had just been grabbed by three teen-agers. Chased by several passers-by, the bad guys had dropped her handbag, so she had it back. Officers were still roaming the neighborhood looking for the thieves. Inside, strummers strummed on. Visit www.mocfa.org for more information and to view other Ukulele events....
Roselle Bailey – A Kaua`i Living Treasure

Roselle Bailey – A Kaua`i Living Treasure

On 21 JULY, 2007, Kaua`i Museum honored its 2007 Kaua`i Living Treasures, among them was Roselle Bailey. Every two or three years, the Museum bestows this title on a small group of people whose service to the community and its culture has been outstanding. Past honorees have included archaeologist Pila Kikuchi, scholar Frances Frazier, musician Jose Bulatao, weaver Esther Makuaole and leimaker Irmalee Pomroy. Roselle came to Kaua`i on 19 May for a photo shoot at the Museum. Ever exuberant Tim Delavega took the pictures, while we took pictures of him taking pictures. You can see some of them below. View the US House of Representatives Document Commendation Letter from Hawaii Governor, Linda Lingle Tim Delavega at work. Roselle Bailey, Kauai Living Treasure 2007 Kaua`i Living Treasures Roselle and the late David Boynton’s mother. David and Pohaku Nishimitsu were post- humously awarded Living Treasure status. Each Living Treasure had a Memorabilia table. This is Roselle’s. One last practice….in the lobby just before performing. The Living Treasures onstage. Left to Right: Roselle Bailey, Linda Faye Collins, Nathan Kalama, Larry McIntosh, Aiko Nakaya The students enter with oli Aloha Tatou Students honor Roselle with dances. Roselle responds by dancing Ho’ola Lahui Hawai’i Roselle dancing as her fellow Living Treasures and her students watch. Peter Dietz escorts Roselle to and from the stage. Roselle, her family and some of the students who attended the banquet. Roselle Bailey and Grandson. Roselle Bailey’s...

My Impressions of India

My Impressions of India by Lynnie – Kananiokeanuenue – July 2007 On our last evening in India, in the last hour of our bus tour of hundreds of miles , as the sun was setting in the sky and upon our long journey, Roselle commanded us to take out a piece of paper and write. Roselle asked us “what did you observe, what did you learn and what were your impressions?” The following is my stream of consciousness, scribbled on scratch paper, as the daylight faded. I saw poverty, the well-to-do and all those in between.  Streets and grounds full of garbage.  Unpleasant smells, basic living conditions, throngs of temple worshippers, beggars, cows and goats, ornate designs, agrarian countryside, a poor country school, a private city school,  the Sea of Bengal, people trying to make a living in shops, on the land,  and in the streets.  Skilled and chaotic driving in cars, 3 wheel cabs, motor scooters, trucks , busses, carts pulled by cattle, lots of food vendors, great Indian cooking, tasty spices, effigies on unfinished buildings, flowers, trees, (no snakes!), funeral processions and beautiful faces. I observed a strong sense of family and tradition.  All the women dressed traditionally-no Western influence.  The people find many ways to celebrate—lots of festivals and dance performances.  They seem to see the good and are accepting of their lot.  People work very hard physically, and therefore are in good condition physically—except for teenagers that look much younger because of poor nutrition—those with less food may not do as well… I learned about Indian Gods (although there is confusion with all the names...

My Experience with Aloha Africa

My Experience with Aloha Africa – A Cultural Exchange by Jessi Jardin When Isa Maria asked me to participate in a cultural exchange with Ghana, I said “yes” without reservation. ALOHA AFRICA was a collaboration of Ernest Borlabi Borketey, master drummer from Ghana, LOVE TRIBE members isa Maria, Melody Harringer, Miliki Lani, Marisa Duggan, Rachel Kattlove, Kay Patrizio, Sharon Gonzales and Jessi Jardin along with TAARANGO’s Paul Jardin and Kalaka. With Ernest as our orchestrator, we learned the rhythmical complexity and cultural significance of Ghanaian music. In exchange, I introduced Ernest to the ipuheke, lei making, foods and medicine of Hawaii. He was a most receptive student. His smile is so radiant.  It speaks to you as brightly as his djembe. When you dance and make music together, there is joy spread throughout the community.  The Hawaiian culture embodies a spiritual way a life.  Hula is life.  Hula is Hawaiian culture. Ernest attended the opening of the Taumako project and joined with us to ho’opa’a “Huki i ke kalo”.  He attended our Ho’ike Hula 2007 in which we performed the India program with halau members who did not go on the trip.  He gave Kaua’i drumming from Ghana.  We gave him Aloha from Kaua’i. On June 23 we celebrated ALOHA AFRICA Ho’ike 2007.  Members of Ka Imi Na’auao o Hawai’i Nei joined with Ernest in opening the show.  With Pu blowing, chanting and hula, our ho’opaa from Ghana was radiant. To culminate the show, we invited the audience to join us for a drum circle.  Most of the audience members rushed to the stage to happily participate in what...
Ka`Imi Member Wedding

Ka`Imi Member Wedding

Weddings were celebrated this year for two Kaimi members. Roselle led the ceremonies for both. Christopher Sutherland (K) married Irene Flack (W)  on Sunday 3 June, 2007 on  Maui. Kalaniumi H. Martin (K) married Kaiulani R. Barretto (W)  on Saturday, 27 October, 2007 on Kauai. Enjoy the celebrations in this collection of photographs thanks to Jim...

Roselle F. K. Bailey’s Letter to Commission for Water Resource Management

May 29, 2007 Commission on Water Resource Management 1151 Punchbowl Street, Room 227 Honolulu, Hawaii 96813 Commissioners, Fellow Citizens, Anoai Tatou, I am Roselle Bailey living in Paukukalo, Maui.  I am representing those who have gone before me and those who have yet to come.  I shall resonate the wisdom of the ancestor’s good governance which is reflected in the Constitution of the State of Hawaii. A proverb: “Use the eyes to observe; the ears to listen; the mouth closed; then one can learn. The ancestors were wise learned leaders and managers who knew the value of observation and listening.  This skill helped prevent being caught in traps and entanglements.  They were experts in reading nature and human-nature. A proverb:  “Born was the land, born were the chiefs, born were the common people (today known as laborers).  The land, the chiefs, and the commoners belong together”. We need each other to tend the land, but the land doesn’t need us. “All public natural resources are held in trust by the state for the benefit of the people.”  At this time in history we must stand together for the life of the land!  Who do we value?  Who are we?  What can we do? A proverb: “A prophecy uttered by Kapihe, a kahuna in Kamehameha’s time” declared; “the ancient kapu will be abolished; the heiau and altars will fall; the islands will be unified; the heavens (chiefs, leaders, managers, etc.) will descend (be humbled) and the earth (the commoners, laborers) ascend (rise to positions of power”). In simple terms, we are all on the same playing board.  Now we must...