Mana, Kapu, and Noa at Keahualaka

Mana, Kapu, and Noa at Keahualaka

Abstract of paper for Association for Social Anthropology in Oceania (ASAO) Annual Meeting, San Diego, CA 9-14 February, 2016. To be presented at the New Proposed Session: The Experiential Roots of Mana MANA, KAPU, AND NOA AT KEAHUALAKA, A SACRED HAWAIIAN SITE AT KE`E, KAUA`I Heu`ionalani Wyeth Ka`Imi Na`auao o Hawai`i Nei Institute Beautiful for situation, Keahualaka (the altar of Laka) or Kauluolaka (the inspiration and growth of Laka) hovers like a mighty bird over Ke`e beach on Kaua`i’s north shore. Lying as it does at the end of the coastal road and near the beginning of famous hiking trail, the site attracts many visitors. Some come specifically to experience the place’s mana, others inadvertently wander in. Whoever they may be and whatever their reasons may be for walking the path up to the site, these people are merely the latest in a line of visitors that goes back centuries. Po`e hula (hula people), students of Polynesian culture, and adherents of traditional Hawaiian religion revere Keahualaka for its connections with Laka, Pele, Hi`iaka, and Lohiau. Photographers, artists, and tourists are inpressed its physical beauty. New Age religionists seek it out as a place of power. Each visitor reacts to the site’s mana differently. The common denominator is that Keahualaka affects everyone, and everyone affects Keahualaka. This has created problems for those who look after the place. Under an agreement with its former owners, our Institute served as volunteer caretakers from 1975 to 1992. During that time, we removed rubbish, eradicated invasive plants, produced informational materials for visitors, and organized cultural performances on site. Our protocol followed the instruction of...
‘Hawaiian style’ lesson plans DVD soon to be released; Ka `Imi Institute continues global cultural exchange

‘Hawaiian style’ lesson plans DVD soon to be released; Ka `Imi Institute continues global cultural exchange

  Members of Ka `Imi Na`auao o Hawai`i Nei Institute are pleased to announce the upcoming release of a teaching video and series of lesson plans, “He Mele no Kane; Hawaiians as Scientists.” This innovative teaching tool promotes cultural learning through films and photographs of traditional chant and hula combined with related lesson plans geared to the classroom. Appropriate for elementary through middle school grades, the DVD will be made available this fall as part of the continuing educational mission of Ka `Imi Na`auao o Hawai`i Nei Institute. Additional advanced lesson plans for high school and advanced levels will follow. School principals, teachers and cultural leaders, librarians adding to Hawaiian resource materials, as well as anyone interested in furthering their understanding of Hawaiian conceptual knowledge may contact the Institute to reserve advance copies of this educational tool. Ka `Imi is a non-profit 501-C3 educational institute that has been in existence since the 1970s. The purchase price of the DVD and lesson plans will be nominal. The “Hawaiians as Scientists” educational project grew out of the successful Ka `Imi staged hula chronicles of “Recalling Hawai`i,” choreographed and directed by Kumu Hula Bailey. Starring casts numbered up to 50 dancers and musicians of the Institute, hailing from school branches world-wide. The crowd-pleasing multi-media spectacular has proven its success in each of eight presentations to date, from Germany and Switzerland (2010), to Kaua`i (2011), Maui (2012), Hawai`i and O`ahu (2013), as well as Northern California (2014).   Following the Hilo Theater presentation, Brenda Lee, a Hawaiian activist, said, “Every school child in Hawai`i should have the opportunity to see and learn from...
Praise for Recalling Hawaii California

Praise for Recalling Hawaii California

Dear Roselle and Jim, Savitri, and the Board, Cast, and Supporters of Ka’imi Na’Auao ‘o Hawai’i Nei: Mahalo Nui Loa for the gift that you gave the people of California.  Your Marin performance of “Recalling Hawaii” was absolutely magnificent! From start to finish the audience was enthralled with the Aloha that you poured upon us.  The sheer truth, beauty, emotional depth, and artistry of it was so powerful that every person in that theater was deeply touched…so deeply that tears were flowing very frequently throughout the show.  Roselle’s words about tears at the show opening really opened the healing flood gates! Sitting in the audience, surrounded by strangers, I constantly heard people gasping with awe, whispering “Wooowww” and “Oh my God!”  Really, it was just amazing the engagement that you performers accomplished with the audience.  It was life-changing for those lucky people who were there. They were so surprised at how good and full of learning this show was! As usual there were people who had no idea there was an overthrow by the USA.  Many in attendance were amazed that there was so much they could learn about Hawaiian culture. After the show one serious hula student friend of mine from Marin exclaimed to me  “I am so ashamed of my poor ability in Hawaiian language!  I must study much harder!”  I heard several people express joyful amazement at how accomplished the kamali’i were.  One man asked me why there were no men dancing.  He said “I know that men dance hula … why were there none here tonight?”  I wished I had a good answer for him....
California Ho’ike

California Ho’ike

Kahiko Ha Lapa I Hula Alapa’i O Ke Anuenue under the direction of Lynn Roth, gathered for a pot luck and Ho’ike, on May 5th, 2013.   All four classes  experienced dancing together, some for the first time. Besides new dances, we performed several “oldies” that everyone knew.  It was a very successful day, as you can see from the smiling faces. Click here for the...
Revisiting Emalani Festival 2012

Revisiting Emalani Festival 2012

IT WAS ALL ABOUT FEATHERS… by Dawn Fraser Kawahara   © Dec. 2012 . . . Yes, feathers. Floating. . . beautiful, soft feathers. Like those of angel wings as often depicted, and then, too, our birds of Koke`e, the treasured jewels of our high mountain island. An image to wake from, a spirit image to stay with me through the day. The dream followed an evening of music, when I had watched my hula brother Jordan raise his clear tenor as he sang from his heart, it seemed, in the college ensemble’s Christmas concert. The music evoked angels, and then, synchronistically, a fluttering movement high in the apex of the church sanctuary caught my eye–a bird. This little package of feathers and fluff seemed quite at home as it perched on a precariously angled corner of the high main beam, then flitted to the back of the church to settle as my attention was reclaimed by the music and a segment of hula presented by the Kaua`i Community College Hula Club. One kahiko chant dedicated to Emalani using feathered `ul§-ul§(gourd rattles) in pheasant colors stirred a memory of the very first Queen Emma Festival in the 1980s, in which we danced and chanted similarly. Feathers, again. The symbolic effect of the bird/spirit moments engraved itself to be played back after a night’s rest, to give me the spark that writers and artists often call “the muse” to write the deeper side of my Emalani 2012 involvement. When I wrote my first draft of my experience with my hula family as part of the Ka `Imi Institute’s presenters during October’s...
Recalling Hawai’i – Maui Performance

Recalling Hawai’i – Maui Performance

Ka`Imi Na`auao `o Hawai`i Nei Institute Presents RECALLING HAWAI`I   Read the Review View the Photos JUNE 2, 2012 6:30 PM MACC CASTLE THEATER Recalling Hawai`i,” is a hula and history chronicle,  spanning from Kumulipo beginnings through present times and the  proud future of  Hawai`i expressed through oli, mele, and hula, and  background visuals. Joining together in this  multi-media presentation are Ka `Imi  members–a cast of over  50 dancers, musicians, and singers–from Hawai`i California, and Europe. The program, which was first presented, by special  invitation, in Heidelberg, Germany and Basel, Switzerland (June 2010) and was performed to a “sold-out” Kauai Community College Performing Arts Center last year, is scheduled to start at 6:30 p.m. At that time we will be entertained by Na Kaholokula, who carry on the tradition of haku mele, Uncle Jimmy Kaholokula, composer of many classic mele such as “Pua Olena”. Read the Maui Now Article, February 6, 2012: Roselle Bailey – Kumu Hula Goes International Ka`Imi Na`auao `o Hawaii Nei Institute Kaimi.org Supported by Hawaii Tourism Authority and  Maui County...
Puaiohi

Puaiohi

Aloha kākou e nā makamaka: He lā hoihoi nō ka 18 o Pepeluali. Ua hele mākou ka po`e hula a me ka po`e mālama manu puaiohi i Koke`e no ka hana ho`opōmaika`i `ana i ke ho`omaka`ana i ka lākou kau mālama manu kupu lau. `O ka Forest Bird Recovery Project (FBRC) ka inoa o ka lākou hui.  Ua ho`olālā lākou e ho`oku`u i nā manu puaiohi he 22, `o ka hapa i hānau `ia a hānai `ia mai Hawai`i mai a me Maui mai kekahi. I ka makahiki 1996, ua ho`omaka ka papahana e ho`omalu ua manu laha `ole lā.  He 200-500 wale nō ma loko o ka āina Alaka`i, Kaua`i.  Noho nā puaiohi ma Alaka`i wale nō. I kēlā makahiki, ua lawe `ia nā hua manu mai Alaka`i mai e nā kānaka FBRP a hiki i nā wahi ho`omalu manu ma Makawao, Maui a me Keauhou Ranch, kokoke i Volcano, Hawai`i.  Ua ho`okumu `ia nā `āuna manu laka `elua ma laila. Mai 1996 a hiki i kēia manawa, he 200 a `oi nā manu laka i ho`oku`u `ia ma Alaka`i mai kēia mau `āuna manu.  Pōmaika`i mākou ka po`e hula i ka hui `ana a ke kōkua `ana iā lākou i kēia hana e ho`omau i nā manu puaiohi. Iā mākou nā mea hula i loa`a ai ke kono e ho`opōmaika`i i ka ho`oku`u `ana i ia wahi manu malihini, ua no`ono`o `ia he manawa kūpono no`u e haku mele e pili ana i kēia hana kūikawā. I ka po`e hula e ho`olālā ana i ka papahana no ka hana ho`opōmaika`i, ua no`ono`o au i nā makahiki he...
Maile Awards Luau

Maile Awards Luau

Members of Kaimi Na`auao O Hawaii Nei institute  joined the Malie Foundation in honoring all kumu hula on Kauai and around the world (especially those honorees on Kauai) at Smith’s Tropical Paradise in Wailua. Honorees included Ku’ulei Punu, Roselle Bailey, Kapu Kinimaka-Alquiza, Beverly Muraoka, Naomi Yokotake, Vern Kauanui, Doric Kaleonui Yaris. Click here to view the photo...
Eo Emalani Festival

Eo Emalani Festival

2011 E`o Emalanai Program for Ka`Imi Na`auao O Hawai`I Nei Institute Aloha tatou. Ka ‘Imi Na’auao o Hawai’i Nei Institute is an educational non-profit organization founded by Roselle Keli’ihonipua Bailey of Maui for preserving and teaching  the Hawaiian culture. To this end, we sponsor activities that include linguistic research, propagation of native plants, learning traditional crafts, and collection of oral histories. As part of our endeavor to gather history from Kaua’i’s west side, we interviewed kupuna Evelyn Olores of Kekaha, a descendent of Queen Emma’s guide, Kaluahi. This interview inspired us to dedicate our program to this remarkable man, whose profound knowledge of the Koke’e region made the Queen’s adventure possible. His family has generously allowed us to perform a mele he composed about the beauty of the mountains that he knew so well. This mele will serve as our program’s introduction. Our salute to Kaluahi extends to all those who have guided and continue to guide us on our individual and collective journeys through time, space, and thought. Two of these are “Uncle Willie Kane”, William Kepahukaniolonookainoahou Goodwin, who gave us the manuscript containing the words to our second song, “Olokele Hula”, and Roselle Bailey’s father, Grandpa Lindsey, who composed its tune. For our last dance, we perform a mele composed by one of our own students. Originally intended as a tribute to our founder, this composition also honors all of our teachers and their teachers. Click here for...
KA `IMI’s ‘Recalling Hawai`i’, A TRIBUTE TO HAWAIIAN PRIDE AND LEGACIES FROM THE ALI`I

KA `IMI’s ‘Recalling Hawai`i’, A TRIBUTE TO HAWAIIAN PRIDE AND LEGACIES FROM THE ALI`I

KA `IMI’s ‘Recalling Hawai`i’, A TRIBUTE TO HAWAIIAN PRIDE AND LEGACIES FROM THE ALI`I by Dawn Fraser Kawahara  © 2011 This year in a May 28 performance, a pinnacle in hula learning and presentational skills for Ka `Imi Na`auao o Hawai`i Nei Institute members was reached during the evening presentation of “Recalling Hawai`i” at the Kaua`i Community College Performing Arts Center. The hula chronicle played to a sold-out house. From the moment the large pu sounded and the chanting began – “Aroha tatou, e na tupuna. . .”– and the spotlights focused on colorfully-costumed figures before a screen splashed with images of Kaua`i and Hawai`i, the energy between audience and cast circled and continued to build over two segments covering several hours of dance and music researched and choreographed to “chart” time from the Kumulipo through the peaceful time of Manokalanipō to the days of the Monarchy. Following “Hawai`i Aloha,” at the closing, the receptive audience awarded the over forty dancers, chanters, musicians and supporters involved in the challenging hula drama with a stand-up “hana hou” reaction. At this point, artistic director and President Emeritus of Ka `Imi Institute, founder Roselle Keli`ihonipua Bailey, of Maui, introduced the cast members  in the ambitious presentation who had traveled to merge together with Kaua`i Ka `Imi members from, O`ahu, Maui, California, and Germany. This Hawai`i premiere built on the the first European performances of “Recalling Hawai`I”, presented successfully in June 2010 in Germany and Switzerland by invitation. Kumu Hula Bailey when interviewed said she chooses to continue the tradition of Hawaiian creativity in finding new ways to blend the old with the...
Recalling Hawaii

Recalling Hawaii

Recalling Hawaii A multi-media chronicle awakening the past, the now and the future of Hawaii with oli, mele, and hula….. “In the beginning there were no canoes or people in canoes…”  Out of the darkness / Po creates life. Hawaiians describe the geologic evolution as interplay between the goddess Pele represented by fire and lava, and the god Kane, embodied in the many forms of water. “It is the time of Ao, the time of light. …there are people in the canoes…” People sail far across the ocean in their canoes to find and cultivate the fertile land. After a long time, other explorers appear from across the sea. The life of the indigenous population changed but the love for their wonderful country remains. The legacy of the royal family lives on with the Hawaiian people until the present time. Today, the dignity and strength of that culture is again valued and honored. Ka `Imi Na`auao O Hawai`i Nei Institute is a 501 (c)3 educational non-profit organization which wasestablished in 1976 by Kumu Hula Roselle Keli`ihonipua Bailey of Maui  “to search for the truth of the Hawaiian culture; to restore the Hawaiian culture to its original dignity; to educate the populace for its understanding, enjoyment and appreciation of the medicine, art, language, crafts, philosophy and religion of the Hawaiian people….”To achieve this goal, the Institute maintains branches and affiliates in Austria, California, Canada, Germany, Kaua`i, Maui, New Zealand, O`ahu, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Switzerland, and Virginia. It also sponsors and organizes educational programs and projects throughout the world Ka`imi’s Kumu Hula and students have come together from several of these branches to...
Kauai World Challenge Canoe Race

Kauai World Challenge Canoe Race

Kaimi dancers welcome the paddlers in the Kauai World Challenge canoe race annual event. Here they are at Kalapaki, greeting the paddlers with traditional and modern hula and oli. Click here to view the flickr photo...

19th Century Manuscripts

In 1979, kupuna William Kapahukaniolonookainoahou Goodwin, Aletha Kaohi’s father, gave Roselle Bailey 2 handwritten books of historical information about Kaua’i, especially about the Waimea district. The books, written in the late nineteenth century by an unknown author or authors, contain stories, mele, names, and other material, much of which is unattested in any other source. They are written in a dialect of Hawaiian apparently unique to west Kaua`i and Ni`ihau. Although many nineteenth century journals and other documents about Kaua`i have been collected and studied by scholars, relatively few of these were written by Hawaiians or in Hawaiian. When “Uncle Willie” Goodwin gave Roselle the manuscripts, he told her to “make the words live.” She did this by choreographing and performing some of the mele at the Merrie Monarch festival among other venues. Concerned about the fragile condition of the books, Ka `Imi’s officers and directors worked with Lynn Davis, Head of the Preservation Department, University of Hawai`i at Manoa Library and contracted the department to stabilize the fragile papers. Grants from the Hawaii Council for the Humanities, the Malie Foundation, and individual donors paid for the conservators’ work, and the books are now protected by the latest preservation technology. To inform the public about the manuscripts and the conservation project, we have published a brochure about the manuscript project. We sent the text of one of the mele, “Ia Aloha ia no Ao Waimea”, to various Hawaiian language experts, inviting them to translate and comment on it. One of the responses forms a page of the brochure. Download the Manuscript Brochure Below: Inside | Outside Because the possibility...

Eo E Emalani I Alaka`i

It was a glorious day in the meadow as Tracyann Hiipoilani Kanahele portraying Queen Emma rode into the meadow on horseback. “Isn’t she beautiful?” “How regally she carries herself!” “I cried when she danced.” were some of the comments as her presence set the tone for what many agreed was one of the best festivals ever. Even the weather co-operated! Clear sky, gentle breeze, neither too hot nor too cold; it was a made-to-order day. Each year performing at the EO Emalani festival in the Kanaloahuluhulu meadow in Koke’e holds special meaning for the Institute as our Kumu, Roselle Keli’ihonipua Bailey, created the annual festival with Hui O Laka in 1987. This year was no exception as we presented pieces Roselle set to rhythm and hula from the hand written 19th century manuscripts given to her decades ago to “bring the words to life”. Although some were presented at Merry Monarch and other venues through the years, this performance was unique to us as we celebrated the professional conservation of these precious manuscripts. Click here for information on the 19th Century Manuscripts given to Roselle...
Recalling Hawai’i – Europe 2010

Recalling Hawai’i – Europe 2010

Traveling and Dancing in Germany and Switzerland June 2010 Submitted by Savitri “Kama” Kumaran  Click here for a flickr photo gallery “Where do we go next?” Whenever the members of Kaimi have traveled this is the question that is asked at the end of the trip! We asked this question when we had completed our trip to Germany in 2004. “India” was the answer! We asked this question again when we completed our wonderful trip to Tamil Nadu, India in 2007. “The Castle in Heidelberg” was the answer! Therefore in early June, 2010, thirty one of us embarked on a journey to Germany and Switzerland. Many months were spent in preparation. The kumu, dancers, speakers, and hosts in Germany and Switzerland organized, practiced and communicated with each other regularly. We came from Oahu, Maui and Kauai and met in Heidelberg, Germany. The Program “Recalling Hawai`I” was to be performed in Heidelberg and Augsberg, Germany and in Basel, Switzerland. Our photo journal tells the story of the practices (many!), preparations for the performances, and the fun we had as we lived, ate, and travelled as one big, happy family for two weeks. Following you will see an article about our program from Augsberg, Germany and impressions of the experience shared by just a few of the participants. The program is a  multimedia experience which includes chants, dances, images, music, song and narration. This is the translation of the information printed on the Geman Halau website :  www.hula.de The hula performance includes a journey from the dawn of time until now, from the Hawaiian point of view – it is a...
Kaua`i World Challenge Canoe Race

Kaua`i World Challenge Canoe Race

Kaua`i World Challenge Canoe Race, Kalapaki Beach May 8, 2010 Once again the cliffs of Kalapaki echoed the sounds of pahu, ipu, and mele as Ka`Imi members greeted competitors in the Kaua`i World Challenge Canoe Race. Dancers, paddlers, and spectators enjoyed being part of the excitement as canoes sped across the bay to change crews on their way from Wailua to Salt Pond. Picture perfect weather (as you can see from the photos which Jesse Castro has kindly allowed us to use) added to the day’s joyful ambience. This is the third time that our members have performed for the World Challenge, and we hope it will not be the last. Mahalo to the race organizers for allowing us to be a part of this event. Click here for a Flickr photo...
Spa Day Fundraiser

Spa Day Fundraiser

Kauai Halau members and friends partner with Vi Ganesan from Kolam to have a fun and nurturing fund raiser. Guests enjoyed hula, yoga, water exercise, nurturing massage and a sumptuous Indian feast. Thank you to all who helped to make this a wonderful day.  Click here for a flickr photo...